Reni Eddo-Lodge Makes History; Oprah Picks James McBride's 'Deacon King Kong' | Book Pulse

Reni Eddo-Lodge is the first Black British author to top the UK book charts with Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race. The Justice Department has filed a lawsuit to stop John Bolton’s book. Oprah picks Deacon King Kong by James McBride as her next book club title. BuzzFeed selects Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas for its July read. Kazuo Ishiguro has a new novel for 2021, Klara and the Sun

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Antiracist Reading Lists, News, and Collection Development/RA Resources

Reni Eddo-Lodge is the first Black British author to top the UK book charts reports The Guardian. Her book is Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race (Bloomsbury Circus: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

Lit Hub has “Booker Prize-winner Bernardine Evaristo on tearing down the statues of slavers.”

The Guardian writes “Can #BlackoutBestsellerList be the reckoning the publishing industry needs?

O: The Oprah Magazine: “Ibram X. Kendi Recommends 10 Books to Better Understand the History of Racism in America.”

The Millions: “An Anti-Racist Graphic Novel Reading List.”

NPR interviews Renée Watson, Piecing Me Together (SLJ starred review), along with Ibram X. Kendi, How To Be an Antiracist (One World: Random House; LJ starred review).

Vogue writes “Millions of People Are Marching Against Racism. Many of Them Are Also Buying Books About It.”

COVID-19 Reading Lists, News, and Collection Development/RA Resources

The L.A. Times has a pandemic diary from Tayari Jones, An American Marriage (Algonquin: Workman: LJ starred review), who writes about trying to vote in Georgia. Also, one from Jervey Tervalon, Monster's Chef (Amistad: Harper).

NPR has a report on libraries in the pandemic, including massive upticks in library card registration and e-book circulation (the later based on data from OverDrive).

The NYT reports on Bookshop.org and that “some booksellers worry it could become another competitor for online business.”

American Libraries gets a lawyer-librarian’s take on “Do Online Storytimes Violate Copyright?

Shelf Awareness reports that Elin Hilderbrand “will hit the road for a four-stop, socially distanced book tour,” starting next week.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Miss Iceland by Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir (Black Cat: Grove Atlantic): “does a brilliant job of conveying, sentence by sentence and word by word, the exotic nature of Icelandic life, its harshness, its connection to the land and to history, and its amusing qualities.” Also, a look at the best books about fairies and their magical worlds.

The NYT reviews The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas by Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis in two new translations. One by Flora Thomson-DeVeaux (Penguin) and the other by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson (Liveright: W.W. Norton): “Flora Thomson-DeVeaux’s edition is a gift to scholars. Her introductory essay and notes offer a rich guide to Machado’s work and world … [but] Jull Costa and Patterson ... offer the superior translation. The language is honed and specific, effortless yet charged with feeling, where Thomson-DeVeaux’s version can feel mustier and blurry.” Also, Billion Dollar Burger: Inside Big Tech's Race for the Future of Food by Chase Purdy (Portfolio: Penguin): "his writing is always punchy and readable, even when he is explaining the complex and gruesome biology of growing a new piece of flesh from an old one.” The Poetry column is out.

NPR reviews Billion Dollar Burger: Inside Big Tech's Race for the Future of Food by Chase Purdy (Portfolio: Penguin): “One of Purdy's strengths is his ease in exposition. He can even be charmingly teacherlike at times.”

Briefly Noted

Oprah has picked her next book club title, Deacon King Kong by James McBride (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review). She has an excerpt and more here.

BuzzFeed ’s July book club pick is Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas (Custom House: Harper).

Kazuo Ishiguro has a new novel for 2021, Klara and the Sun (Knopf, March 2). The Guardian has a report.

Diana Gabaldon announces on Twitter that she is working on an Outlander prequel about Jamie's parents and has another Lord John Grey book in the works too. Town & Country reports.

The Justice Department has filed a lawsuit to stop John Bolton’s book. The Washington Post reports. Deadline has the response from Bolton’s lawyer. NPR has a report as well. The book is currently the bestselling book on Amazon.

Vanity Fair writes about Mary Trump’s book, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (S. & S.).

USA Today offers summer reading picks.

New York Public Library has “Discover New Reads for Pride Month 2020.”

CrimeReads offers “8 Debut Novels You Should Read This June.”

The Scribe Awards announce their nominees. These are the awards for media tie-in writers.

AudioFile announces new Golden Voice Lifetime Achievement Awards.

Entertainment Weekly has an audio excerpt of Devolution: A Firsthand ­Account of the Rainier Sasquatch Massacre by Max Brooks (Del Rey: Ballantine; LJ starred review).

The Washington Post features The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides (Celadon: Macmillan) in a special “series for people who have already read the book and want to think more deeply about the ending.”

Bitch Media features You Exist Too Much by Zaina Arafat (Catapult).

USA Today interviews Mike Birbiglia, The New One: Painfully True Stories from a Reluctant Dad (Grand Central). Entertainment Weekly also has an interview.

Hachette U.K. is standing by J.K. Rowling. Vulture has details.

Jezebel has a story on Rachel Hollis, Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are so You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be (Thomas Nelson: Harper).

The NYT has a feature story on “Why More Children’s Books Are Tackling Sexual Harassment and Abuse.” The paper also has an essay by Dwight Garner about letters, great ones and the lack today.

Time reports on “The Risky Journey That Saved One of China’s Greatest Literary Treasures.”

Authors on Air

Gizmodo reports that Max Brooks’s Devolution is headed to the movies.

Variety reports on Netflix’s first look at season two of The Umbrella Academy.

Deadline has a feature on Barkskins. Showtime sets late November for the debut of The Comey Rule, based on A Higher Loyalty. Amblin Partners wins rights to The Mechanic by Ben Mezrich. Sony Pictures Classics has moved Guiseppe Capotondi’s The Burnt Orange Heresy to Aug. 7. It is based on the novel by Charles Willeford.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

Get connected. Join our global community of more than 200,000 librarians and educators.

Get access to 8000+ annual reviews of books, ebooks, and more

As low as $13.50/month