NPR Books Summer Poll 2021: A Decade Of Great Sci-Fi And Fantasy | Book Pulse

NPR announces “NPR Books Summer Poll 2021: A Decade Of Great Sci-Fi And Fantasy.” The Science Fiction Research Association (SFRA) has announced the 2021 winners of its annual research awards. Zimbabwe’s Tsitsi Dangarembga wins the German Book Trade Peace Prize. The 2021 Munsey Award Nominees are announced by PulpFest. The Carl Brandon Society celebrates what would have been Octavia E. Butler's 74th birthday with a series of #CelebratingOctavia virtual events. Brandon Taylor's Filthy Animals gets raves. Melissa Febos’s craft-book-meets-memoir, Body Work, will be published in 2022 by Catapult. Slate looks at representation and casting in audiobook publishing and The NYT considers a generation of writers’ approaches to consent. The viral New Yorker story "Cat Person" by Kristen Roupenian will get feature film treatment and Inspector Maigret returns to television in a new adaptation.

 

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Awards & Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NPR announces “NPR Books Summer Poll 2021: A Decade Of Great Sci-Fi And Fantasy.” Readers can nominate series and individual books published in the last 10 years for consideration. Amal El-Mohtar, Ann Leckie , Tochi Onyebuchi, and Fonda Lee will serve as judges.

Zimbabwe’s Tsitsi Dangarembga wins German Book Trade Peace Prize. Publishing Perspectives has a story.

The Science Fiction Research Association (SFRA) has announced the 2021 winners of its annual research awards. Locus reports.

The 2021 Munsey Award Nominees are announced by PulpFest. Locus reports.

The Carl Brandon Society is celebrating what would have been Octavia E. Butler's 74th birthday with a series of #CelebratingOctavia virtual events. Livestream here. Tor has more details.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Lorna Mott Comes Home by Diane Johnson (Knopf): “Fans of Diane Johnson will not be disappointed. Those new to her work might best approach these pages through the lens of a social anthropologist who studies the lives of characters prone to problem solving by crisscrossing the Atlantic.” Also, Widespread Panic by James Ellroy (Knopf): "A proud contrarian at 73, Ellroy clearly has little use for contemporary sexual politics or mores, but these Chandleresque echoes jangle all the same, because they work against the mission of his career, which has been to excavate a new pulp myth from the wreckage of the old." Morningside Heights by Joshua Henkin (Pantheon): "Henkin tours a wealth of landmarks and neighborhoods with authority and affection (and you don’t need to know the city to relish them)."

The NYT reviews All the Water I've Seen Is Running by Elias Rodriques (Norton): “Rodriques’s prose is as measured as it is nuanced. This gradually comes to seem less a stylistic choice than a means of survival for his protagonist.” Also, Shape: The Hidden Geometry of Information, Biology, Strategy, Democracy, and Everything Else by Jordan Ellenberg (Penguin Pr.): “Ellenberg gives his inner tour guide free rein and geometry becomes the shortest narrative path between any two seemingly disparate mathematical points. It makes for a deeply enjoyable and insightful book.” China in One Village: The Story of One Town and the Changing World by Liang Hong, translated by Emily Goedde (Verso): “speaks to universal challenges, problems facing not just Chinese villages but also alienated communities around the world.” From Sarah to Sydney: The Woman Behind All-of-a-Kind Family by June Cummins with Alexandra Dunietz (Yale Univ. Pr): “thorough and engrossing, and at times I wished for a less dry, less academic voice to go along with the juicy subject. But this is, after all, a work of scholarship, with the serious goal of establishing Taylor as an author who both reflected and shaped ideas of what it meant to be Jewish in America. By that metric, Cummins more than succeeds.”  What You Can See from Here by Mariana Leky, translated by Tess Lewis (Farrar, Straus and Giroux): “Her charm can verge on preciousness, particularly when it comes to sex and love, but for the most part, there is a satisfying spark to her short, declarative sentences.” 

NPR reviews A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars by Hakeem Oluseyi (Ballantine; LJ starred review): “an important book for anyone who wants to understand how the fire of inquiry, the burning demand to know the world and its beauty intimately, can take root in a heart and lift it up to shine brightly with the stars it most cherishes.” 

USA Today reviews Filthy Animals by Brandon Taylor (Riverhead), giving it 4 out of 4 stars: "Taylor is an important literary talent, not least for his ability to render the familiar into the shockingly unfamiliar."

Briefly Noted

Melissa Febos’s craft-book-meets-memoir, Body Work will be published in 2022 by Catapult. Lit Hub has a writeup and cover reveal.

Quinta Brunson, She Memes Well (Houghton Harcourt) has advice for black content creators at PopSugar.    

Kelsey McKinney, God Spare the Girls (William Morrow: HarperCollins) writes about religion and virginity for Elle.

Sarah Stewart Taylor, A Distant Grave (Minotaur: St. Martin’s) writes about how Elizabeth Bowen’s “big house” laid “the groundwork for Irish domestic noir” at CrimeReads.

The Atlantic's Books Briefing considers "Finding Place as a Black American."

Slate looks at representation and casting in audiobook publishing.

The NYT considers a generation of writers’ approaches to consent.

Vox looks at the redemptive ethics of dark detective novels through standard bearer Louise Penny.

LitHub has a piece on “How Black Writers Capture the Comedy and Dark Absurdity of Life in America.”

Vox calls Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's controversial comments a distraction.  

CrimeReads has “6 debut novels you should read this month.”

Bustle has "new books out this week."

The NYT reports that “Robert Quackenbush, Creator of Animal Detective Stories, Dies at 91.” 

Authors on Air

Inspector Maigret returns to television as returning drama series in new adaptation of George Simenon detective novels. Playground’s deal with George Simenon Limited includes all 75 novels and 28 short stories based on the Jules Maigret character. Deadline has the story

Nicholas Braun an, Emilia Jones will headline the forthcoming Cat Person, based on viral New Yorker story by Kristen Roupenian. The Hollywood Reporter has the story.

T&C rounds up "What We Know About the Hulu Show Starring Nicole Kidman," based on bestselling Nine Perfect Strangers by Lianne Moriarty (Flatiron).

The Hollywood Reporter has an interview with Emilia Clarke on GOT, Solo, and her new comic M.O.M.: Mother of Madness, Volume 1 (Image Comics).

A sign of major changes in Hollywood, Stephen Spielberg’s Amblin Partners and Netflix create partnership, Variety reports.

Popsugar has what to know about the original Gossip Girl book, in preparation for the HBO Max reboot.

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