Bi Writers Assn. Names Molly Wizenberg Bi Writer of the Year | Book Pulse

The 2020 Bisexual Book Awards Winners including All Adults Here by Emma Straub, Off Balance by Jay Hogan, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V. E. Schwab, Noble by Bianca Phipps, and Bi Writer of the Year Molly Wizenberg, The Fixed Stars. Jürgen Kaube receives inaugural German Nonfiction Prize. The 2021 Alberta Literary Awards are announced. The Schomburg Center Literary Festival starts its second day of programming and continues through Saturday. Participants include Chris Abani, Hanif Abdurraqib, Tressie McMillan Cottom, PhD, Ben Okri, and many more. The July Loanstars List is out, featuring #1 pick While We Were Dating by Jasmine Guillory.  Plus, Marlon James previews Season 2 of the podcast Marlon & Jake Read Dead People.

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Awards & Events

The Bi Writers Association announced The 2020 Bisexual Book Awards Winners including All Adults Here by Emma Straub (Riverhead), Off Balance by Jay Hogan (Southern Lights), The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V. E. Schwab (Tor; LJ starred review), Noble by Bianca Phipps (Button Poetry) and Bi Writer of the Year Molly Wizenberg, The Fixed Stars (Abrams; LJ starred review).

Jürgen Kaube receives inaugural German Nonfiction PrizePublishing Perspectives has the writeup and shortlist.

Bertrand Bickersteth and Timothy Caulfield are among the winners of the 2021 Alberta Literary Awards. CBC reports.

The Schomburg Center Literary Festival starts its second day of programming and lasts through Saturday, June 19. Participants include Chris Abani, Hanif Abdurraqib, Tressie McMillan Cottom, PhD, Ben Okri, and many more.

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Great Dissenter: The Story of John Marshall Harlan, America’s Judicial Hero by Peter S. Canellos (S. & S.): “The arc of Canellos’s narrative is comforting, bending toward justice, with the long Jim Crow era eventually yielding to Brown v. Board and the 1964 Civil Rights Act.” Also, Everything Now: Lessons from the City-State of Los Angeles by Rosecrans Baldwin (MCD): “And in not trying, he may have written the perfect book about Los Angeles.”  Republic of Detours: How the New Deal Paid Broke Writers To Rediscover America by Scott Borchert (Farrar): “Borchert’s survey is absorbing from beginning to end and impeccably researched and written; it neglects neither telling details nor big-picture conclusions, and it lets each of its central figures come alive on the page" Plus, The Outlier: The Unfinished Presidency of Jimmy Carter by Kai Bird (Crown): “intentionally, and inadvertently, explains why American presidents continue to learn as much from President Carter’s mistakes as from his many achievements.” The Sweetness of Water by Nathan Harris (Little, Brown): “Harris is working hard to undercut and reimagine the vision of post-Civil War America that readers commonly encounter, especially in novels and films of recent vintage.” Morningside Heights by Joshua Henkin (Pantheon): “His story of a brilliant Shakespearean and his wife — once his student — radiates a tenderness for the city that we, his intended readers, can best appreciate — perhaps now most of all, as we ask our city to return to us.”  Hard Like Water by Yan Lianke (Grove): “seeks to make a mockery of claims to political purity. As Hongmei and Aijun arouse each other with propaganda slogans and revolutionary citations, the novel pokes fun at how easily an ideology can be contorted to satisfy individual desires.”  Strange Flowers by Donal Ryan (Penguin): “has the feel of an intriguingly transitional work, a steppingstone in the career of an adventurous and courageously affirmative novelist."  The Killing Hills by Chris Offutt (Grove; LJ starred review): “Shackling this narrative to the crime/mystery genre is like shackling a mule to substitute for a porch post: Perhaps it can be done, but why?”  Plus, "Group Text” dives into The Damage by Caitlin Wahrer (Pamela Dorman) and there are paired reviews of Last Best Hope: America in Crisis and Renewal by George Packer (Farrar) and The Constitution of Knowledge : A Defense of Truth by Jonathan Rauch (Brookings Inst. Pr.): “Speaking Truth to Both the Right and the Left.”

The Washington Post reviews Should We Stay or Should We Go by Lionel Shriver (HarperCollins): “can appear heartless as the author rearranges her plot pieces into new formations with almost insolent ease, disdaining anything as cheap as an appeal for readers’ emotional engagement. It’s only gradually apparent that this sharp-elbowed satire is also a brusquely tender portrait of enduring love.”

NPR reviews The Natural Mother of the Child: A Memoir of Nonbinary Parenthood by Krys Malcolm Belc (Counterpoint): “His experience is far from universal, but nearly everyone can relate to the transformative experience of falling in love — with a person, with a child — and the ways that love can shape our identities.”

Briefly Noted

The July Loanstars List is out, featuring #1 pick While We Were Dating by Jasmine Guillory (Berkley).

"New Book Publisher Caters to Conservative Voices It Says Are Being Silenced," reports The WSJ.

The LA Times interviews Amanda Kloots about her new memoir, Live Your Life: My Story of Loving and Losing Nick Cordero (Harper).

Tordotcom shares an excerpt from The Unraveling by Benjamin Rosenbaum (Erewhon).

USA Today quotes from The Queer Bible by Jack Guinness (Dey Street Books).

Jonathan Parks-Ramage, Yes, Daddy (HMH) and Ryan O'Connell “reveal the anxiety they share with Cher” at Entertainment Weekly.

ElectricLit has “7 Books About Teen Friendships From the 1970s to the 2000s.”

USA Today features “The best books of 2021 so far: What USA Today’s critics loved reading.”

BookRiot explains slipstream. Plus, “9 Riveting Memoirs About Crime Families.”

“Richard Baron, Who Published Baldwin and Mailer, Dies at 98,” reports The NYT.

Authors on Air

The LA Times talks with novelist-podcaster Marlon James about Season 2 of Marlon & Jake Read Dead People, in which “they’ll turn to books new to at least one of them, along with some quirkier choices — while sticking to their theme of speaking candidly of the dead.”

NPR’s Morning Edition speaks with Kai Bird, The Outlier: The Unfinished Presidency of Jimmy Carter (Crown) about Carter’s four years in office.

The Hollywood Reporter looks at streaming fatigue, as “Average Number of Services Per User Falls for First Time.” Plus, Monica Lewinsky signs first-look producing deal with 20th TV, on the heels of Impeachment: An American Crime Story, based on the book A Vast Conspiracy: The Real Story of the Sex Scandal That Nearly Brought Down a President by Jeffrey Toobin. Lewinsky serves as producer for the series. THR reports.

The psychological thriller Brother, based on the novel by Ania Ahlborn, is set to begin filming in the Fall, Variety reports.

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