Marieke Lucas Rijneveld Wins the International Booker Prize | Book Pulse

Marieke Lucas Rijneveld wins the International Booker Prize for The Discomfort of Evening. Elle writes “Black Women Are Topping Bestseller Lists. What Took So Long?” Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson is now the bestselling antiracist title. Royal by Danielle Steel leads five new books onto this weeks bestseller lists. Netflix is adapting The Noel Diary by Richard Paul Evans and Stephanie Land’s Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive. Also, now on Netflix, the Making of the Witcher.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Royal by Danielle Steel (Delacorte Press: Random House) debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Jackal by J.R. Ward (Gallery: S. & S.) takes No. 8 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis (Dutton: Penguin) claims No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Live in Love: Growing Together Through Life's Changes by Lauren Akins, Mark Dagostino (Ballantine: Random House) holds No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Lose Weight Like Crazy Even If You Have a Crazy Life!: Life Lessons and a Breakthrough 30-Day Nutrition and Fitness Solution! by Autumn Calabrese (Galvanized Media: S. & S.) gives advice at No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Against the Loveless World by Susan Abulhawa (Atria: S. & S.): “artfully looping together comings and goings, entrances and exoduses, burials and birthdays in a humming narrative of human movement.” Also, Hitler: Downfall: 1939-1945 by Volker Ullrich, translated by Jefferson Chase (Knopf): “Ullrich suggests that the Hitlerian regime was capable of only two registers: euphoria and despair.”

NPR reviews Superman's Not Coming: Our National Water Crisis and What We the People Can Do About It by Erin Brockovich (Pantheon: Random House): “an impeccably researched book that brings science, court cases, depositions, interviews, history, and personal experience to the table to make strong points about the dire state of many of our water systems — and the consequences of it.” Also, Beowulf: A New Translation: A New Translation by Maria Dahvana Headley (MCD x FSG: Macmillan): “you have to read it now.”

Entertainment Weekly reviews Daddy: Stories by Emma Cline (Random House), giving it an A- and writing “this pitch-black collection of 10 stories emerges as its own kind of success.”

Book Marks names the “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Marieke Lucas Rijneveld wins the International Booker Prize for The Discomfort of Evening (Graywolf Press: Macmillan). The Guardian reports and has an interview. The NYT ran a feature on the author in April and has a report on the win.

Elle writes “Black Women Are Topping Bestseller Lists. What Took So Long?

In forthcoming book news, USA Today reports that the “Comedy in Color” standup franchise has made an audio book, Laugh Out Loud Presents Comedy in Color, Volume 1 (S. & S. Audio). It arrives Sept. 29.

S.A. Cosby, Blacktop Wasteland (Flatiron Books: Macmillan; LJ starred review), has summer reading suggestions for Amazon.

CrimeReads suggests “5 Debut Novels You Should Read This August.”        

B&N names its most anticipated books of September.

In LJ, Barbara Hoffert has new "Prepub Alert" columns, taking readers to Feb. 2021.

CBC features “47 works of Canadian nonfiction coming out in fall 2020.”

Electric Lit suggests “9 New Translated Books by Women.”

The NYT runs its newest “Otherworldly” SFF column. Also, the NYT’s “New & Noteworthy” column is out.

Book Riot gathers “16 Wonderful #OwnVoices YA Books About Disability.”

Michael Dirda considers the best books for kids, from his base of experience. The Washington Post has his report.

The NYT reports on the MoMA show about Félix Fénéon, calling its exhibition catalog, Félix Fénéon: The Anarchist and the Avant-Garde, a “treasure.”

Amazon has some suggestions for what to read after The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett (Riverhead: Penguin).

Jill Lepore, If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future (Liveright: W. W. Norton), is the subject of the NYT “By the Book” column.

The L.A. Times showcases Hari Kunzru, Red Pill (Knopf).

People highlights David Chang, Eat a Peach: A Memoir (Clarkson Potter: Random House). Also, a piece about Madeleine Westerhout, Off the Record: My Dream Job at the White House, How I Lost It, and What I Learned (Center Street: Hachette).

Fox News features Deanna Durbin: A Hollywood Fairy Tale: The Legend of Edna Mae by William Harper (BearManor Media).

Electric Lit interviews Lucie Britsch, Sad Janet (Riverhead: Penguin).

Jeff Kinney, bus fixer extraordinaire and author of Rowley Jefferson's Awesome Friendly Adventure (Abrams), stars in the NYT’s “Inside the List” column. SLJ has a related column.

The NYT runs the poem “Ode to the Oranges of Jaffa” by Philip Metres as selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

O: The Oprah Magazine writes about author Lauren Morrill, It's Kind of a Cheesy Love Story (FSG: Macmillan) who came up with the viral internet quote "I don't know how to explain to you why you should care about other people," only to have it credited to another, and now, to Dr. Fauci.

The James Beard Awards for chefs and restaurants are falling apart in the face of no Black winners and troubles with the nominees, with as Eater puts it, facing “allegations [that] range from bullying to sexual harassment, leading the foundation to reassess what constitutes award-worthy chef behavior.” There will be no winners this year or next. The NYT reports too. Thus far, no word about the cookbook awards, which have already been announced for 2020 with Jubilee: Recipes from Two Centuries of African-American Cooking by Toni Tipton-Martin (Clarkson Potter) winning one of the top prizes.

ReBoot: Books, Business, and Reading, "a virtual conference aimed at preparing the publishing industry for 2021,” will take place on October 13. Publishers Weekly has details.

Shelf Awareness has the news that B&N is closing its Baltimore Inner Harbor store.

LibraryReads posts its Readers’ Advisory 101 presentation, based on its 2019 UnConference online.

New York Magazine has a celebration of Gail Sheehy.

Authors on Air

NPR’s All Things Consider interviews Veronica Chambers, Finish the Fight!: The Brave and Revolutionary Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote (Versify: HMH).

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Rick Perlstein, Reaganland: America's Right Turn 1976-1980 (S. & S.; LJ starred review).

Vulture has a piece about the long delayed The New Mutants, debuting this Friday and based on the Marvel comics characters.

Star Trek Discovery begins on CBS on Sept. 24. PBS’s Worlds of Ursula K. Le Guin, directed by Arwen Curry is streaming free through the 30th. Tor.com reports.

Some Netflix news: The Noel Diary by Richard Paul Evans is getting adapted by the streamer and so is Stephanie Land's Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive. Altered Carbon is canceled, after two seasons. Deadline reports. Also, Netflix has made a Making of the Witcher film. The trailer is now up but the entire show is also now streaming in full.

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