Lisa Lucas To Head Pantheon & Schocken Books | Book Pulse

Lisa Lucas, executive director of the National Book Foundation since 2016, is moving to Random House. She has just been named senior vice president of Pantheon and Schocken Books. Colson Whitehead announces his next book, Harlem Shuffle, due out in fall 2021. Tara June Winch wins the Miles Franklin award, the top Australian book prize, for The Yield. Desolation Road by Christine Feehan leads new bestsellers. White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo tops the antiracist bestsellers.

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Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor by Layla F. Saad (Sourcebooks; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Daniel Tatum (Basic Books: Hachette): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown (Convergent Books: Penguin; LJ starred review): No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Desolation Road by Christine Feehan (Berkley: Penguin) claims No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor by Hank Green (Dutton: Penguin; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Bad Guys by Aaron Blabey (Scholastic) holds No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Memoirs and Misinformation by Jim Carrey and Dana Vachon (Knopf) takes No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Separated: Inside an American Tragedy by Jacob Soboroff (Custom House) opens at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Beauty in Breaking: A Memoir by Michele Harper (Riverhead: Penguin) holds No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The L.A. Times reviews The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones (Gallery/Saga: S. & S.; LJ starred review): “strains to weave a horror story with robust character studies. In the end, there is enough in each strand to appeal to both the genre fan and the literary reader, even if neither is fully reconciled to the other.”

The Washington Post reviews A Good Family by A.H. Kim (Graydon House: Harper): “a lively suspense diversion that provides the eternally welcome assurance that nobody has it all, at least not forever.”

The NYT reviews Eat the Buddha: Life and Death in a Tibetan Town by Barbara Demick (Random House): “deeply reported …. a prismatic picture of history as experienced and understood by individuals in their full amplitude and idiosyncrasy … covers an awe-inspiring breadth of history.” Also, False Alarm: How Climate Change Panic Costs Us Trillions, Hurts the Poor, and Fails to Fix the Planet by Bjorn Lomborg (Basic: Hachette): “would be downright dangerous were it to succeed in persuading anyone that there was merit in its arguments. This book proves the aphorism that a little knowledge is dangerous. It’s nominally about air pollution. It’s really about mind pollution.”

NPR reviews The Do-Over by Jennifer Honeybourn (Swoon Reads: Macmillan): “you will not be able to put it down until you slide, breathless, into the last chapter.”

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Tara June Winch wins the Miles Franklin award, the top Australian book prize, for The Yield (HarperVia ; LJ starred review). The Guardian reports.

Colson Whitehead announces his next book, Harlem Shuffle, due out in fall 2021. Entertainment Weekly has an interview.

Tor.com has news that Brandon Sanderson has a new Stormlight Archive novella on the way, to be titled Dawnshard.

Lisa Lucas, executive director of the National Book Foundation since 2016, is moving to Random House. She has just been named senior vice president of Pantheon and Schocken Books. The Washington Post reports.

Electric Lit has “11 Novels Starring Essential Workers.”

Book Riot has “Contemporary Native Literature: Looking Beyond the “Indian Du Jour.”

Kevin Kwan offers summer reads for Amazon.

Lit Hub highlights “5 Books You May Have Missed in June.”

NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour considers the Audible production of Neil Gaiman’s Sandman. The NYT also has a review, writing “This is what dreaming sounds like.”

Politico Magazine digs into Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man by Mary Trump (S. & S.): “Mary Trump has not indicted her uncle. She has indicted the whole family. And that could give it a ‘seismic imprint.’

Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Mexican Gothic (Del Rey: Random House), features in the NYT’s “Inside the List Column.”

The Guardian writes about Nick by Michael Farris Smith (Little, Brown: Macmillan).

Vogue writes “The New Nanny Novel Is a Political Statement.”

The Washington Post interviews Mary Trump, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (S. & S.).

Tor.com announces Christopher Paolini will have a virtual tour to support To Sleep in a Sea of Stars (Tor Books: Macmillan).

The Washington Post showcases Mary Morris, All the Way to the Tigers: A Memoir (Nan A. Talese: Random House). The paper also has an interview with Colin Jost, A Very Punchable Face: A Memoir (Crown: Random House) and appreciates the work of Victorian author William Clark Russell.

Entertainment Weekly features Derrick Barnes, I Am Every Good Thing (Nancy Paulsen Books: Penguin) in its “What’s In A Page” column.

The Hollywood Reporter features Josh Malerman, Malorie (Del Rey: Ballantine).

Tor.com excerpts The First Sister by Linden A. Lewis (Gallery: S. & S.; LJ starred review).

DC comics will bring back the Rorschach character in a new comic by Tom King. Entertainment Weekly has details. USA Today reports that some are uneasy about the plans.

Tor.com has “A Brief History of Mexican Horror Comic Books” by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Mexican Gothic (Del Rey: Random House).

io9 has a list of “The 22 Can't-Miss Panels of Comic-Con 2020 (at Home).”

Electric Lit has the short story "Absences" by Mary Jones, introduced by Brandon Taylor.

The NYT runs the poem “The Body’s Uncontested Need to Devour: An Explanation” by Major Jackson, selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

The Washington Post writes “America’s libraries are essential now” in a piece that showcases a newly renovated building in D.C.

The National Book Critics Circle announces its new board.

The British Library has acquired over 300 of writer and artist Mervyn Peake illustrations. In addition to his literary work, he is “arguably the finest children’s illustrator of the mid-20th century,” said the British Library. The Guardian reports.

Author Steven Pinker is in the news as “more than 550 academics recently signed a letter seeking to remove him from the list of “distinguished fellows” of the Linguistic Society of America.” The NYT reports.

Joanna Cole, the author of the Magic School Bus books, has died. USA Today has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Netflix is adapting the Usagi Yojimbo comic books by Stan Sakai. AMC is adapting Guillermo Corral’s graphic novel El Tesoro del Cisne Negro (The Treasure Of The Black Swan). Netflix buys global rights for A Suitable Boy, but not for the US. A sale for those rights is already in the works but the deal is not public, nor finalized. Deadline reports.

Author Melissa de la Cruz joins with Disney Publishing Worldwide to launch a new studio. CBS and the NAACP partner on content in a new venture as well. The Hollywood Reporter has details.

Jimmy Fallon will host Jim Carrey, Memoirs and Misinformation (Knopf), tonight.

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