Jason Reynolds Is the Inaugural Honorary Chair of Banned Books Week | Book Pulse

Jason Reynolds is set as the inaugural Honorary Chair of Banned Books Week. Fourth Estate and William Collins will introduce a modern classics list featuring titles from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Anthony Doerr, and more. Ottessa Moshfegh’s next novel, Lapvona, will be published by Penguin next summer. Oscar-winning director Ron Howard and actor Clint Howard announce The Boys: A Memoir of Hollywood and Family, to be released in October. AC/DC singer Brian Johnson’s memoir The Lives of Brian drops this fall. Frank Marshall and director Barry Sonnenfeld will partner to adapt Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley into a 2D animated feature.  Joe Cornish will direct the adaptation of Mark Millar’s comic Starlight and Truman and Tennessee: An Intimate Conversation will hit theaters on June 18th. Plus, a review of World Travel: An Irreverent Guide, in which the NYT asks "How Do You Write an Anthony Bourdain Book Without Anthony Bourdain?"
 

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Awards and Honors

Jason Reynolds is set as the inaugural Honorary Chair of Banned Books Week, Entertainment Weekly reports.

Winners of the Tolkien Society Awards 2021 are announced. Locus has the list of winners. 

The finalists for the Colorado Book Awards 2021 are revealed with winners to be announced June 26, 2021.

Reviews

The NYT reviews When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain (Ballantine): “a thoughtful exploration of the rippling impact of early trauma, perfect for true-crime aficionados and fans of “Law & Order: SVU” who find themselves eager to challenge the genre’s laser focus on perpetrator psychology over victimology.” Also, Antiquities by Cynthia Ozick (Knopf): “I don’t understand why Ozick decided to write this of all books — about an elderly man in a former boarding school reminiscing about a 12-year-old boy whose primary exoticism was being Jewish.”   Open Water by Caleb Azumah Nelson (Grove Press, Black Cat): “Azumah Nelson’s poetic brilliance, his ability to balance the general and the specific, the ambient and the granular, makes for a salient achievement.”  The Passenger by Ulrich Alexander (Metropolitan Books): “the work of a very young man, both urgent and perishable, and written at some remove from the events and atmospheres it describes.” And Under the Wave at Waimea, by Paul Theroux (Houghton Harcourt): “When it comes to living the unexamined life, this surfing slacker would give even Tolstoy’s Ivan Ilyich a run for his money.”  Books of the Times features  Why Didn’t You Just Do What You Were Told? : Essays by Jenny Diski (Bloomsbury): “Some of the essays in Diski’s book are better than the others. The earlier ones, in fact, are a bit finer than the later — more intimate and free-floating.” Plus, World Travel: An Irreverent Guide by Anthony Bourdain & Laurie Woolever (Ecco: HarperCollins; LJ Starred Review): “read cover to cover, country by country, it is an enduring embodiment of Anthony Bourdain’s love for the whole world and a reminder of how to stack our priorities the next time we’re able to follow in his footsteps.” The NYT also has short reviews of three Sci Fi & Fantasy titles and a New and Noteworthy section.

The Washington Post reviews Last Chance Texaco: Chronicles of an American Troubadour by Rickie Lee Jones (Grove): "To Jones, among the most acclaimed singer-songwriters of the past 40 years, the hand of fate does not have a light touch." Also, First Person Singular by Haruki Murakami (Knopf): “doesn’t break much new ground, but it will remind readers why Murakami’s work is singular.” And, A Light in the Dark: A History of Movie Directors by David Thomson (Knopf): “if the future of the movies, like the future of everything, is uncertain, Thomson’s writings leave no doubt that its past, while far from innocent, is full of glorious magic.”  The paper also has a Q&A with by Annabelle GurwitchYou're Leaving When? : Adventures in Downward Mobility (Counterpoint).

NPR reviews I Have Been Buried under Years of Dust: A Memoir of Autism and Hope by Valerie Gilpeer & Emily Grodin (Morrow): “a chronicle of not only finding one's voice, but of learning to make others understand that voice — a whisper to a scream in reverse.”

Briefly Noted

Oscar-winning director Ron Howard and actor Clint Howard announce their new memoir called The Boys: A Memoir of Hollywood and Family, to be released in October by William MorrowThe Hollywood Reporter confirms.

Fourth Estate and William Collins to introduce a modern classics list featuring titles from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Anthony Doerr, Joan Didion and more, reports The Bookseller.

LitHub announces the forthcoming publication of Ottessa Moshfegh’s next novel, Lapvona, scheduled to be published by Penguin Press next summer.

Penguin will also publish AC/DC singer Brian Johnson’s memoir The Lives of Brian this fall, USA Today reports.

The NYT’s Group Text highlights What Comes After by JoAnne Tompkins (Riverhead) for book clubs.

BookRiot suggests new releases for the TBR pile.

Buzzfeed has a list of virtual book events happening this week.

Vanity Fair offers a list of 13 books to read this month and Bustle has 9 new must-read books.

 The Millions goes inside The Souvenir Museum by Elizabeth McCracken (Ecco).

Popsugar has booklists of What to Read after The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins27 Uplifting Beach Reads, and a look at Emma Dabiri's forthcoming second book, What White People Can Do Next: From Allyship to Coalition (Harper Perennial).

Bustle unveils a cover reveal of Nnedi Okorafor’s highly anticipated forthcoming  Noor (DAW), her first novel for adults in six years.

Publishers Weekly writes about Fable, "a new platform for online book clubs that allows users to join clubs moderated by experts, authors, and influencers, or to start their own clubs."

Authors on Air

Author and Social Critic Tressie McMillan Cottom discusses “the moral panics of our moment” on The NYT’s Ezra Klein Show.

Frank Marshall and director Barry Sonnenfeld will partner to adapt Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley (Knopf; LJ Starred Review) into a 2D animated feature. The Hollywood Reporter has the story.

Ryan Gosling will star and produce The Actor, based on the best-selling novel Memory by Donald E. Westlake.

Also Joe Cornish will direct the adaptation of Mark Millar’s comic Starlight, The Hollywood Reporter confirms.

Town & Country has a story and trailer of the new documentary Truman and Tennessee: An Intimate Conversation, in theaters on June 18th.

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