Isabel Wilkerson, Les and Tamara Payne Shortlisted for 2021 Lukas Prizes | Book Pulse

Caste by Isabel Wilkerson, The Dead Are Arising by Les Payne and Tamara Payne, and After the Last Border by Jessica Goudeau are among the books on the 2021 shortlists for the Lukas Prizes from the Columbia Journalism School and the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. Adaptations coming out this week include Cherry, based on the book by Nico Walker, Moxie, based on the book by Jennifer Mathieu, and The Mauritanian, based on Guantánamo Diary by Mohamedou Ould Salahi. BuzzFeed Book Club's March pick is Surviving the White Gaze by Rebecca Carroll. Plus, the official trailer for The Underground Railroad, based on the book by Colson Whitehead, is out, as is a premier date: May 14.

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Awards and Honors

The 2021 shortlists for the J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Awards, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, and the Mark Lynton History Prize are up. The awards, from the Columbia Journalism School and the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University, honor the best in American nonfiction writing. Among those in consideration are Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review), The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X by Les Payne, Tamara Payne (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review), and After the Last Border: Two Families and the Story of Refuge in America by Jessica Goudeau (Viking: Penguin).

The Biographers International Organization has announced the longlist for the 2020 Plutarch Award.

Lynne Thompson has been named the 2021 poet laureate of Los Angeles.

Page to Screen

Feb. 26:

Cherry, based on the book by Nico Walker. Apple. Reviews | Trailer

The Girl on the Train, based on the book by Paula Hawkins. Netflix. No reviews | Trailer

Feb. 28:

Don't Waste Your Pretty, based on the book by Demetria L. Lucas. TV One. No reviews | Trailer

The Walking Dead, based on the comics by Robert Kirkman, Tony Moore, and Charlie Adlard. AMC. Reviews | Trailer

Mar. 2:

The Flash, which has associated titles. The CW. No reviews | Trailer

The Mauritanian, based on Guantánamo Diary by Mohamedou Ould Salahi. VOD. Reviews | Trailer

Mar. 3:

Moxie, based on the book by Jennifer Mathieu. Netflix. No reviews | Trailer

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Smoke by Joe Ide (Mulholland: Hackette): "In its own idiosyncratic fashion, 'Smoke' is superb." Also, America and Iran: A History, 1720 to the Present by John Ghazvinian (Knopf: Random House): "There is simply nothing new here." Keats’s Odes: A Lover’s Discourse by Anahid Nersessian (Univ. of Chicago): "The book’s intimacy, vulnerability and determination to provoke is true to Keats, and Nersessian’s genuine feeling for his work is never in doubt." The Black Church: This Is Our Story, This Is Our Song by Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Penguin): "Gates’s book helps advance Black religious thought and culture by exploring what it means to be Black and Christian in modern America, elevating it as a topic worthy of serious investigation." All Girls by Emily Layden (St. Martin's: Macmillan): "Layden sets a perfect table, and she makes a stirring dinner speech, but this reader left the dining hall still hungry." The Delusions of Crowds: Why People Go Mad in Groups by William J. Bernstein (Atlantic Monthly): "...a fun book to read, though a windy one." Touch: Recovering Our Most Vital Sense by Richard Kearney (Columbia): "Too much of the book — particularly the first and concluding sections — features Kearney earnestly positing tired questions and letting them lead him to equally banal conclusions." The Hidden Spring: A Journey to the Source of Consciousness by Mark Solms (W. W. Norton): "...remarkably clear, accommodating and exciting to read."

For the NYT, Junot Díaz reviews The Committed by Viet Thanh Nguyen (Grove): "Any other shortcomings? Yes, a very big one: The novel ends." Also, the crime column covers four recent releases

Book Marks’ "Best Reviewed Books of the Week."

CrimeReads rounds up the best reviewed crime novels of February.

Briefly Noted

BuzzFeed Book Club's March pick is Surviving the White Gaze by Rebecca Carroll (S. & S.).

The NYT recommends 12 recent releases, plus 13 forthcoming YA books.

PopSugar suggests "15 Romance Novels About Black Love, Written by Black Authors."

Electric Lit lists "Books About Anti-Asian Racism in America."

Book Riot has "15 Books About Miscarriage And Pregnancy Loss."

Ransom Riggs shares his favorite recent reads with Amazon.

io9 has a first-look at the new book from Marissa Meyer, a fairy-tale retelling of Rumpelstiltskin called Gilded (Feiwel & Friends: Macmillan), which is due out Nov. 2.

The NYT has an excerpt from Singled Out: The True Story of Glenn Burke by Andrew Maraniss (Philomel: Penguin), which arrives March 2.

Sarah Polley, the actor, screenwriter, and director, will add "author" to that list when her book of essays, Run Towards the Danger (Hamish Hamilton Canada), publishes in March 2022. The CBC has details.

Polygon has an interview with Maureen Johnson, plus an excerpt of her Cruella-inspired YA novel Hello, Cruel Heart (Disney: Hachette), which is due out April 6.

Read an excerpt of Sweet & Bitter Magic by Adrienne Tooley (Margaret K. McElderry: S. & S.) at Tor.com. It'll be out March 9.

The Booklist Reader's "10 Questions" go to Elizabeth Everett, A Lady's Formula for Love (Berkley: Penguin).

The Guardian profiles Megan Nolan, Acts of Desperation (Little, Brown: Hachette). Also, the paper's "Books That Made Me" column features Colum McCann

The L.A. Times profiles Annabelle Gurwitch, You're Leaving When?: Adventures in Downward Mobility (Counterpoint: Penguin).

Sherry Turkle discusses her memoir, The Empathy Diaries (Penguin), with the NYT.

The Millions has a conversation between short story authors Te-Ping Chen, Land of Big Numbers (Mariner: HMH), and Brenda Peynado, The Rock Eaters (Penguin). 

The Guardian looks at the recent surge in France of memoirs alleging sexual abuse.

A list of literacy-related places seeking donations to help with relief efforts in Texas, via Book Riot.

Authors on Air

The official trailer for The Underground Railroad, based on the book by Colson Whitehead, is out. The series will premier on Amazon Prime Video May 14.

There's a teaser for the new season of The Handmaid’s Tale, based on the book by Margaret Atwood. It starts on Hulu April 28.

Phoebe Robinson will write and star in the adaptation of her book Everything’s Trash But It’s Okay. Paul W.S. Anderson will direct and Milla Jovovich and Dave Bautista will star in the feature In the Lost Lands, which is based on a short story by George R.R. Martin. Deadline reports.

Madison Wells has picked up the rights to Come as You Are by Emily Nagoski, with plans to develop film, television, and a podcast. The Hollywood Reporter has details.

Sara Horowitz, Mutualism: Building the Next Economy from the Ground Up (Random House), discusses job security and insecurity in our country on the Keen On podcast. 

R.W.W. Greene discusses The Light Years (Angry Robot: Watkins) on the New Books Network podcast.

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