'Interior Chinatown' and 'The Dead Are Arising' Win the 2020 National Book Awards | Book Pulse

Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu and The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X by Les Payne and Tamara Payne are among the winners of the 2020 National Book Awards. The Law of Innocence by Michael Connelly tops both the NYT and USA Today Bestsellers lists. The Washington Post unveils multiple best-of 2020 lists. The 2020 Writers’ Trust awards winners are out. Joy Harjo will serve a rare third term as U.S. poet laureate. Wonder Woman 1984 will be released in theaters and HBO Max on Christmas Day.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

National Book Awards Winners

Fiction: Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu (Pantheon: Random House)

Nonfiction: The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X by Les Payne, Tamara Payne (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review)

Poetry: DMZ Colony by Don Mee Choi (Wave: Ingram)

Translated Literature: Tokyo Ueno Station by Yu Miri and translated by Morgan Giles (Riverhead: Penguin)

Young People’s Literature: King and the Dragonflies by Kacen Callender (Scholastic)

The NYT, NPR, Entertainment Weekly, and the L. A. Times have reports. 

Here is a link to a recording of the ceremony, which at the end includes a performance by John Darnielle, Translated Literature judge, author, and frontman of The Mountain Goats, of their song "This Year."

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

The Law of Innocence by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown: Hachette) debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

I Would Leave Me If I Could: A Collection of Poetry by Halsey (S. & S.) takes the stage at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Marauder by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin) starts at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz (Harper) solves the case at No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Ickabog by J. K. Rowling (Scholastic) is No. 10 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The World Needs Who You Were Made to Be by Joanna Gaines and Julianna Swaney (Thomas Nelson: HarperCollins) lands at No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Leopard's Rage by Christine Feehan (Berkley: Penguin) holds No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Bad Guys in The One?! by Aaron Blabey (Scholastic) claims No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man by Emmanuel Acho (Flatiron, An Oprah Book: Macmillan) debuts at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

First Principles: What America’s Founders Learned From the Greeks and Romans and How That Shaped Our Country by Thomas E. Ricks (Harper; LJ starred review) is at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Pappyland: A Story of Family, Fine Bourbon, and the Things That Last by Wright Thompson (Penguin) toasts No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Greatest Beer Run Ever: A Memoir of Friendship, Loyalty, and War by John "Chick" Donohue and J. T. Molloy (William Morrow: HarperCollins) take off at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

One Life by Megan Rapinoe (Penguin) kicks off at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 11 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 13 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 14 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews A Sound Mind: How I Fell in Love With Classical Music (and Decided to Rewrite its Entire History) by Paul Morley (Bloomsbury: Macmillan): "Morley is a bright writer, and most of his commentary on specific pieces and composers is sophisticated and insightful. But he wallows in overwriting (as in this book’s subtitle), and has a weird predilection for repetition and afterthought."

The Washington Post reviews Singular Sensation: The Triumph of Broadway by Michael Riedel (Avid Reader: S. & S.; LJ starred review): "...his copy is sinfully entertaining, full of dish and drama and delivered with the wicked wit Broadway pros can’t help but admire."

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

The 2020 Writers’ Trust awards winners include Two Trees Make a Forest: In Search of My Family’s Past Among Taiwan’s Mountains and Coasts by by Jessica J. Lee (Catapult: Ingram) and Ridgerunner by Gil Adamson (House of Anansi Press). 

The Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant's 2020 grantees include six writers working on books

The the shortlist for the 2020 Reading Women Award in nonfiction is out.

The Washington Post picks the best of the year: Fiction | Nonfiction | Poetry | Graphic Novels & Comic Books | Thrillers & Mystery | Sci-Fi, Fantasy & Horror | Romance | Audiobooks

Reviewers at Tor.com pick their favorite books of the year.

Amazon recommends non-fiction out this month

CrimeReads suggests 7 new international crime novels.

Barbara Hoffert has new Prepub Alert columns in LJ.

The Washington Post "recommends new intellectual and cultural histories."

Rupi Kaur, Home Body (Andrews McMeel: S. & S.), shares her favorite books of the year with Amazon. 

Joy Harjo will serve a rare third term as U.S. poet laureate. She is also the first Native American poet appointed to the post. PBS NewsHour reports.

A Promised Land by Barack Obama (Crown: Random House) sold more than 887,000 copies on its first day, putting it in the running for the best-selling presidential memoir yet. USA Today reports.

Black Privilege Publishing is a new imprint from Simon & Schuster’s Atria Books. Led by Charlamagne tha God, its first release will be State of Emergency by activist Tamika D. Mallory. Publishers Weekly reports. 

Dhonielle Clayton, Tiffany D. Jackson, Nic Stone, Angie Thomas, Ashley Woodfolk, and Nicola Yoon are teaming up to write Blackout (Harper Collins). It's due out June 2021. Entertainment Weekly has details. 

Tor.com excerpts The Frozen Crown by Greta Kelly (Harper Voyager), due out Jan. 12, 2021.

Read an excerpt of The Project by Courtney Summers (Wednesday: Macmillan) at BuzzFeed.

Poets & Writers has "10 Questions" go to Simon Han, Nights When Nothing Happened (Riverhead: Penguin).

In Entertainment Weekly, Mychal Denzel Smith, Stakes Is High: Life After the American Dream (Bold Type Books: Hachette) shares some of his inspirations. Also, a conversation with John Ridley, The Other History of the DC Universe (DC Comics).

Vanity Fair’s "Career Timeline" series features Dolly Parton, Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics (Chronicle).

Matthew McConaughey talks about Greenlights (Crown: Random House) with Esquire.

The NYT's "Books of the Times" column features Funeral Diva by Pamela Sneed (City Lights). Brandon Stanton, Humans (St. Martin’s Press: Macmillan), is the paper's “Inside the List” feature author. The “By the Book” column features Robert Macfarlane, Ghostways: Two Journeys in Unquiet Places (W. W. Norton).

Vogue has a Q&A with Cazzie David, No One Asked for This (Mariner: HMH).

Susie Yang talks with Bustle about White Ivy (S. & S.; LJ starred review).

Elle has a conversation with Danielle Evans, The Office of Historical Corrections: A Novella and Stories (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review).

Wright Thompson discusses Pappyland: A Story of Family, Fine Bourbon, and the Things That Last (Penguin) with Amazon.

Jo Nesbo on The Kingdom (Knopf: Random House) at CrimeReads.

Guernica interviews Claire Messud, Kant’s Little Prussian Head and Other Reasons Why I Write (W. W. Norton).

Kiese Laymon, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America (Agate Bolden: Ingram; LJ starred review), writes about Fleetwood Mac, his mailman, and his high school students for Vanity Fair.

The NYT reports the White House sought to pursue legal action against former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman soon after the announcement of Unhinged: An Insider's Account of the Trump White House (Gallery: S. & S.).

The Guardian remembers George Powers Cockcroft, known by the pseudonym Luke Rhinehart, who died at age 87.

Tracey Davis, whose biography of her father, Sammy Davis Jr., is being adapted into a film, has died. The AP reports.

Author Jill Paton Walsh has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Wonder Woman 1984, which has associated titles, will be released simultaneously in theaters and on HBO Max on Dec. 25. The Hollywood Reporter has details.

ABC gives a script commitment to a series continuation of Waiting to Exhale, based on the book by Terry McMillan. Also, Nick Kroll's new production company will adapt the forthcoming book Several People Are Typing by Calvin Kasulke (Doubleday). Character 7 picked up the rights to two thrillers by Holly Watt: To The Lions and The Dead Line. Deadline reports.

Behind the scenes of the film adaptation of Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau; LJ starred review) via the NYT.

Anthony Horowitz discusses Moonflower Murders (Harper) and Alex Rider on NPR's Fresh Air

Ree Drummond talks about Frontier Follies: Adventures in Marriage and Motherhood in the Middle of Nowhere (William Morrow: HarperCollins) with Fox & Friends.

David Sedaris, The Best of Me (Little, Brown: Hachette), is on with Drew Barrymore today.

Michael J. Fox, No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality (Flatiron: Macmillan), appears on Watch What Happens Live tonight.

Barack Obama, A Promised Land (Crown: Random House), will talk with Jimmy Kimmel tonight.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?