Hilderbrand Cuts Anne Frank Reference From 'Golden Girl' | Book Pulse

Elin Hilderbrand removes Anne Frank reference in Golden Girl after complaints. Publishing Perspectives rounds up news from the 2021 Abu Dhabi International Book Fair. The Edelweiss Bookfest wraps up today, with speakers, author panels, and keynotes by Anthony Doerr and Seija Rankin. The Burning Blue by Kevin Cook gets a 4 star review from USA Today. Jessamyn Stanley's new book Yoke: My Yoga of Self-Acceptance gets a starred review. LibraryReads and Library Journal team up on read-alikes for The President’s Daughter by Bill Clinton and James Patterson. Emilia Clarke’s debut comic book, M.O.M.: Mother of Madness, Volume 1 hits shelves in July. Plus, a preview and excerpt of Blood, the forthcoming memoir by Jonas Brothers.

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News & Events

"Elin Hilderbrand asks for Anne Frank reference to be cut from novel after complaints", reports The Guardian. Slate offers this perspective

Publishing Perspectives rounds up news from The 2021 Abu Dhabi International Book Fair.

The Edelweiss Bookfest wraps up today, with speakers, author panels, and keynotes by Anthony Doerr and Seija Rankin.

Reviews

USA Today reviews The Burning Blue: The Untold Story of Christa McAuliffe and NASA’s Challenger Disaster by Kevin Cook (Holt) giving it 4 out of 4 stars: “Cook’s crisply crafted journalism and perceptive take on the personalities that shaped the Challenger mission – along with NASA’s struggles and failures – make for a riveting narrative and complex cross-weave of themes.”

NPR reviews Dear Senthuran: A Black Spirit Memoir by Akwaeke Emezi (Riverhead): “an honest and lyrical accounting of a boundless mind exploring the wide expanse of creativity and experience.” Plus, “3 Books For An Inner Journey.”

The NYT reviews Everyone Knows Your Mother Is a Witch by Rivka Galchen (Farrar): “within the novel’s sharpest and most humorous moments, there’s a deep underlying sadness for an elderly woman reckoning with the loss in her life.” Also, Rainbow Milk by Paul Mendez (Doubleday): “a winding coming-of-self story that moves with the uncertainty of a boy trying to become the kind of man he’s never witnessed: one living on his own terms.”  The President’s Daughter by Bill Clinton and James Patterson (Little, Brown & Knopf): “It goes without saying that nothing in this silly but highly entertaining book will end well for the terrorists, or the Chinese, or Pamela Barnes and her creepy husband, Richard.” Plus, paired reviews of Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth by Bryan Burrough & Chris Tomlinson & Jason Stanford (Penguin Pr; LJ starred review) and A Single Star and Bloody Knuckles: A History of Politics and Race in Texas by Bill Minutaglio (Univ. of Texas Pr.), as both books explore the “bizarreness of Texas”  Lastly, a “New Audiobooks” section has three short reviews.

The Washington Post reviews With Teeth by Kristen Arnett (Riverhead): "Absolutely captivating and scathingly frank, it’s a story of motherhood stripped of every ribbon of sentimentality."

The LA Times reviews Republic of Detours: How the New Deal Paid Broke Writers To Rediscover America by Scott Borchert (Farrar): “a lively history of the project and its writers, but it offers something even more valuable: a lesson in the organizational challenges and poisonous politics that eventually doomed the FWP not in spite of its best intentions, but because of them.”

Briefly Noted

LibraryReads and Library Journal offer read-alikes for The President’s Daughter, by Bill Clinton and James Patterson (Little, Brown & Knopf), this week’s buzziest book.

People talks with Jessamyn Stanley, Yoke: My Yoga of Self-Acceptance (Workman; LJ starred review) about white supremacy and cultural appropriation in American yoga. Also, People speaks with Anne Morrison Chewning about assembling her brother’s writings in The Collected Works of Jim Morrison: Poetry, Journals, Transcripts, and Lyrics by Jim Morrison (Harper Design). Plus, a preview and excerpt of Blood: A Memoir by the Jonas Brothers by Jonas Brothers and Neil Strauss (Dey Street Books).

Entertainment Weekly talks with Kristin Higgans, Pack Up the Moon (Berkley) about the books in her life. EW also interviews Paul Rudnick, Playing the Palace (Berkley) about his new book and why it is perfect for Pride Month.

The Washington Post has a Q&A with John Paul Brammer on his new book ¡Hola Papi!: How to Come Out in a Walmart Parking Lot and Other Life Lessons (S. & S.).

Vulture has insight from Zakiya Dalila Harris, The Other Black Girl (Atria; LJ starred review) on how to write a twist ending.

Eric Redman, Bones of Hilo (Crooked Lane) writes about past, present, and future of Hawaiian detective fiction at CrimeReads.

LitHub has an excerpt from The Burning Blue: The Untold Story of Christa McAuliffe and NASA’s Challenger Disaster by Kevin Cook (Holt) on how Richard Feynman helped crack the case.

USA Today has "Amazon's Top 10 books of 2021 so far, ranked."

“Robert Hollander, Who Led Readers Into ‘The Inferno,’ Dies at 87”, reports The NYT.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air has an interview with Daisy Hernandez, The Kissing Bug: A True Story of a Family, an Insect, and a Nation's Neglect of a Deadly Disease (Tin House) about “Race, Sexuality And A Deadly Insect.”

Deadline reports that Bridgerton‘s Adjoa Andoh will narrate the audiobook of Tina Andrew’s Charlotte Sophia: Myth, Mandess and the Moor, (Recorded Books). The audio is slated for a June 22, 2021 release.

DC League of Super-Pets, with associated titles, gets all-star voice castThe Hollywood Reporter has the story.

Variety has coverage on Emilia Clarke’s Debut Comic Book, M.O.M.: Mother of Madness, Volume 1 (Image Comics), which hits shelves in July.

Bill Clinton and James Patterson, The President’s Daughter (Little, Brown & Knopf), will visit Jimmy Kimmel tomorrow night.

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