Susan Abulhawa and Rumaan Alam Among Finalists Announced for 2021 Aspen Words Literary Prize | Book Pulse

The finalists for the 2021 Aspen Words Literary Prize are Against the Loveless World by Susan Abulhawa, Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam, The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich, The Office of Historical Corrections by Danielle Evans, and If I Had Two Wings by Randall Kenan. New fiction bestsellers include Faithless in Death by J. D. Robb and The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles, and new nonfiction bestsellers include Walk in My Combat Boots by James Patterson and Matt Eversmann and Between Two Kingdoms by Suleika Jaouad. To honor what would have been Toni Morrison’s 90th birthday, the NYT offers suggestions on where to start with her books. Plus, Mindy Kaling's production company is working on a TV adaptation of Gold Diggers by Sanjena Sathian.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

Faithless in Death by J. D. Robb (St. Martin's: Macmillan) debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles (Atria: S. & S.) checks in at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Reckless Road by Christine Feehan (Berkley: Penguin) pulls in at No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Rafael by Laurell K. Hamilton (Berkley: Penguin) begins at No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Walk in My Combat Boots: True Stories from America's Bravest Warriors by James Patterson and Matt Eversmann (Little, Brown: Hachette) stands at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Between Two Kingdoms: A Memoir of a Life Interrupted by Suleika Jaouad (Random House; LJ starred review) is No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends: The Cyberweapons Arms Race by Nicole Perlroth (Bloomsbury: Macmillan) begins at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Unfinished: A Memoir by Priyanka Chopra Jonas (Ballantine: Random House) starts at No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The L.A. Times reviews Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York by Alexander Nemerov (Penguin): "The resulting book is lively but short, skimming the surface of Frankenthaler’s work."

The Washington Post reviews Sybille Bedford: A Life by Selina Hastings (Knopf: Random House): "Notwithstanding all the detail in these packed pages, Hastings somehow never quite accounts for what must have been a case of extraordinary charisma." Also, My Year Abroad by Chang-rae Lee (Riverhead: Penguin): "...a wild tale that moves coolly between satire and thriller."

NPR reviews No One Is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood (Riverhead: Penguin): "It's another attention-grabbing mind-blower which toggles between irony and sincerity, sweetness and blight."

USA Today reviews True Believer: The Rise and Fall of Stan Lee by Abraham Riesman (Crown: random House), which earns 3 stars: "One need not be a comics nerd to find Riesman's portrait of the deeply flawed and relatably human pop-culture icon an absorbing read, and some of its revelations are stunning." 

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

The finalists for the Aspen Words Literary Prize are: Against the Loveless World by Susan Abulhawa (Atria: S. & S.), Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam (Ecco: Harper), The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich (Harper; LJ starred review), The Office of Historical Corrections by Danielle Evans (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review), and If I Had Two Wings by Randall Kenan (W.W. Norton). The winner will be announced on April 21.

The 2021 Carnegie longlist, "the UK’s most prestigious children’s books prize," is out. The Guardian has the list.

The Chicago Literary Hall of Fame will present its Fuller Award for lifetime achievement to Sandra Cisneros in a virtual ceremony on March 13.

Shelf Awareness previews new books out next week.

CrimeReads rounds up recent and forthcoming "dark academia" thrillers

Parade lists "25 New Books Written By Women of Color We Can’t Wait to Read This Year."

Entertainment Weekly has details on Amor Towles' next novel, The Lincoln Highway (Viking: Penguin), which is due out Oct. 5.

CrimeReads has an excerpt from Shoot the Moonlight Out by William Boyle (Pegasus: S. & S.). It's due out Nov. 2.

People interviews Madeleine Dean and Harry Cunnane about Under Our Roof: A Son's Battle for Recovery, a Mother's Battle for Her Son (Convergent: Random House).

Charlotte McConaghy talks wanderlust and Migrations (Flatiron: Macmillan; LJ starred review) with the L.A. Times.

CrimeReads has a panel discussion with espionage fiction authors Lara Prescott, Lauren Wilkinson, Rosalie Knecht, and Tracy O’Neill.

The NYT goes "Inside the List" with Martha Teichner, When Harry Met Minnie: A True Story of Love and Friendship (Celadon: Macmillan). Also, the paper's "By the Book" column features Joe Ide, Smoke (Mulholland: Hachette).

"It’s by erasing these little portions of its history that are shameful or distasteful or disturbing that American mythology is created," Laila Lalami, Conditional Citizens: On Belonging in America (Pantheon: Random House), says in an interview at the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Kirkus has a Q&A with Joy McCullough, We Are the Ashes, We Are the Fire (Dutton Books for Young Readers: Penguin).

Kristin Iversen profiles Patricia Lockwood, No One Is Talking About This (Riverhead: Penguin), at Lit Hub.

Alisha Rai discusses her "big catfish ever after story," First Comes Like (Avon: HarperCollins), with Shondaland.

The Rumpus interviews Bhaswati Ghosh, Victory Colony, 1950 (Yoda).

Book Riot suggests "20+ Of The Best Book Newsletters For Readers."

To honor what would have been Toni Morrison’s 90th birthday, the NYT offers suggestions on where to start with her books.

Following a report on comments advocating "extremist political violence" on the discussion forum Baen’s Bar, publisher Baen Books closed the forum temporarily so it can "investigate those serious allegations." File 770 reports.

SFF author Jason Sanford looks into the discussion forum Baen’s Bar, run by publisher Baen Books, and comments posted there advocating "extremist political violence."

We Need Diverse Books is working with Penguin Random House on the Black Creatives Fund, which includes a "'Revisions Workshop,' a mentoring program, and market symposia," according to Publishers Weekly, to help more Black writers get published.

After weeding books by Ann Coulter and Donald Trump from his library's collection, and, later, burning them, a Chattanooga library staffer was fired for “improperly removing items from the Library’s collections.” The Washington Post has details.

Authors on Air

Mindy Kaling's production company is working on a TV adaptation of Gold Diggers by Sanjena Sathian (Penguin), which is due out April 6. The feature adaptation of Kenneth Feinberg's memoir What Is Life Worth, from Barack and Michelle Obama’s Higher Ground, has been picked up by Netflix. Roughcut TV picks up the rights to adapt Little Disasters by Sarah Vaughan. Deadline reports on all.

A live-action series based on Neglected Murderesses by Edward Gorey is in the works for AMC. Variety has more.

Heather McGhee talks about The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together (One World: Random House) on NPR's Fresh Air.

NPR's Throughline looks at "How Octavia Butler's Sci-Fi Dystopia Became A Constant In A Man's Evolution."

Calvin Trillin discusses "the public figures whose names have been the best and worst for rhyming in his work" on the Keen On podcast.

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