Comic-Con@Home Kicks Off | Book Pulse

Comic-Con@Home has begun. Jason Reynolds has an adult novel set for 2022. Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man by Mary Trump is the top-selling book for the week. The Order by Daniel Silva reigns over the fiction list. The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue is B&N’s August book club pick. The shortlist is out for the Macavity Awards. Hulu options Curtis Sittenfeld’s Rodham.

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Comic-Con@Home, Jason Reynolds, & More Buzzy News

Comic-Con@Home has begun and will run through the weekend. Here is the program. Here is the YouTube channel. ING also has a channel worth checking out. As a reminder, the Esiner Awards will be announced on Friday at 7 pm PDT. Variety picks the best panels.

Jason Reynolds will publish his debut novel for adults in 2022. It is titled The Mouthless God and Jesus Number Two and will be published by Scribner (S. & S.).

The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue (Little, Brown: Hachette) is B&N’s August book club pick.

The shortlist is out for the Macavity Awards.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

The Order by Daniel Silva (Harper) opens at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Peace Talks by Jim Butcher (Ace: Berkley: Penguin: LJ starred review) holds No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Adventure Zone: Petals to the Metal by Clint McElroy, illustrated by Carey Pietsch (First Second: Macmillan) takes No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Utopia Avenue by David Mitchell (Random House) plays it out at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

A Walk Along the Beach by Debbie Macomber (Ballantine Books: Random House) closes out the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list at No. 10 and takes No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Cajun Justice by James Patterson, Tucker Axum III (Grand Central: Hachette) closes out the the USA Today Best-Selling Books list at No. 13.

Nonfiction

Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man by Mary Trump (S. & S.) debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

A Very Punchable Face: A Memoir by Colin Jost (Crown: Random House) holds No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Big Friendship: How We Keep Each Other Close by Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman, (S. & S.) takes No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor by Layla F. Saad (Sourcebooks; LJ starred review): No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (The New Press): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Daniel Tatum (Basic Books: Hachette): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The L.A. Times reviews A Star Is Bored by Byron Lane (Henry Holt: Macmillan): “Lane turns out to be such a good writer, so funny and rapier sharp.” Also, Pew by Catherine Lacey (FSG: Macmillan): “ambitious, often unsettling.”

The Washington Post reviews The True History of the First Mrs. Meredith and Other Lesser Lives by Diane Johnson (NYRB Classics): “originality and jazzy brilliance.”

NPR reviews Baseless: My Search for Secrets in the Ruins of the Freedom of Information Act by Nicholson Baker (Penguin): “As any seasoned FOIA requester knows, requests often end the same way ... a frustrating jumble of unrelated and inconclusive documents. Sadly, such is the same with Baseless.”

The NYT reviews Wonderland by Zoje Stage (Mulholland: Little, Brown; LJ starred review): “mind-bending, trippy.” Also, Intimations: Six Essays by Zadie Smith (Penguin).: “Anxiety lurks through these few pages. This is a work of minor dimensions at — and about — a major time.” Love and Theft by Stan Parish (Doubleday: Random House): “its racecar engine revving to a smooth and satisfying purr — it can feel to the reader like a kind of miracle. In a word: thrilling.”

Book Marks selects “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Jacob Soboroff features in the NYT “Inside the List” column. His new book is Separated: Inside an American Tragedy (Custom House).

Briefly Noted

CrimeReads suggests “5 Debut Novels You Should Read This July.”

O: The Oprah Magazine gathers “25 Books About Immigration That Movingly Capture the Experience.”

Barbara Hoffert has new “Prepub Alert” columns in LJ, reaching into February 2021.

Lit Hub finds out “What 100 Writers Have Been Reading During Quarantine.”

Amazon has “Favorite first lines from 2020 fall novels.”

Electric Lit has “9 Books to Read If You’re Missing Olympic Gymnastics.”

Book Riot offers “12 Queer Witch Books to Bring the Magic to Your TBR.”

The NYT considers poetry with “Looking at Epic Poetry Through 21st-Century Eyes.”

The L.A. Times showcases Natasha Trethewey and Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review).

The Atlantic features Intimations: Six Essays by Zadie Smith (Penguin).

The Washington Post features Jerome Grant, Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking by National Museum of African American History & others (Smithsonian).

Buzz Feed excerpts I Hold a Wolf by the Ears: Stories by Laura van den Berg (FSG: Macmillan).

Tor.com excerpts Automatic Reload by Ferrett Steinmetz (Tor: Macmillan).

Electric Lit excerpts What Happens at Night by Peter Cameron (Catapult).

Vulture excerpts Great Demon Kings: A Memoir of Poetry, Sex, Art, Death, and Enlightenment by John Giorno (FSG: Macmillan).

NPR excerpts Larger Than Life: A History of Boy Bands from NKOTB to BTS by Maria Sherman (Black Dog & Leventhal: Hachette).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts K-pop Confidential by Stephan Lee (Point: Scholastic).

The Guardian interviews Mary Trump, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (S. & S.).

Aimee Bender is the focus of the NYT “By the Book” column. Her new book is The Butterfly Lampshade (Doubleday: Random House).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Maggie O’Farrell, Hamnet (Knopf).

The Washington Post interviews Alicia Yin Cheng, This Is What Democracy Looked Like: A Visual History of the Printed Ballot (Princeton Architectural).

The Millions has “Mieko Kawakami on Her Favorite Murakami Story.”

Constance Curry has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Hulu options Curtis Sittenfeld’s Rodham. Perry Mason gets a second season. Variety reports.

HBO MAX will air Gomorrah, based on the book by Roberto Saviano. The Great British Bake Off will come back to Netflix later this year. The Crown gets pushed back to 2022. BritBox is airing The Beast Must Die, an adaptation of the Nicholas Blake novel. Terri White’s memoir Coming Undone is headed to TV. Deadline reports on all.

Disney+ releases a sneak peek of its forthcoming docuseries about Marvel comics, Marvel 616. It airs this fall.

Netflix announces that it will run The Legend of Korra.

Mary Trump, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (S. & S.), will be on The View today.

Ben Folds, A Dream About Lightning Bugs: A Life of Music and Cheap Lessons, (Ballantine: Random House) will be on with Stephen Colbert tonight.

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