A New Trailer for 'The Underground Railroad' | Book Pulse

The new trailer for Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad gets a great deal of coverage for a May 14 release. The Jhalak Prize for Book of the Year by a Writer of Color and Sheikh Zayed Book Award shortlists are announced. Also, the 2021 Helen & Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize shortlist is announced. Oprah Winfrey’s upcoming book tour and April 27 release of new book What Happened to You makes news. Terry Crews discusses the new audiobook Stronger Together, co-written with his wife with lessons from his life and marriage. Phoebe Robinson, author of Please Don't Sit On My Bed In Your Outside Clothes, speaks about the lack of diversity in publishing. A television series based on Greyboy: Finding Blackness In A White World is being developed. Concerns are being raised about a police officer’s book regarding the killing of Breonna Taylor. Lastly, there is an interview with Lawrence P. Jackson, author of a biography on Chester B. Himes on the importance of Black crime writers.

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Book Award News

The Rathbones Folio Prize was deceived by cyber-criminals who stole prize money meant for Valeria Luiselli. The Guardian reports.

The 2021 Helen & Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize shortlist is announced.

The Jhalak Prize for Book of the Year by a Writer of Color shortlist is released.

The Sheikh Zayed Book Award shortlists is announced.

The Leapfrog Global Fiction Prize splits into two categories: adult and YA.

The Owned Voices Novel Award winners are announced.

The 2021 Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize longlist winners are announced.

The 2021 Desmond Elliott Prize longlist is announced.

The 2021 Crime Writers’ Association Dagger awards longlists are revealed.

The shortlist for the Griffin Poetry list is unveiled.

The Reading the West book award finalists are announced.

Page to Screen

April 16:

Van Helsing, inspired by Zenescope Entertainment’s graphic novel series Helsing. Syfy. Reviews| Trailer

April 19:

Midsomer Murders, based on the book series Chief Inspector Barnaby created by Caroline Graham. Acorn TV. No reviews | Trailer

The Secrets She Keeps, based on the book by Michael Robotham. AMC. Reviews| Trailer

Reviews

NPR reviews Leaving Isn’t the Hardest Thing (Vintage: Random House; LJ starred review) by Lauren Hough: “She tells it like it is, and it's heartbreaking — but to find our way out, we have to see things clearly first. Any survivor of a cult or an abusive relationship will tell you that.”

The Guardian reviews In the Thick of It: The Private Diaries of a Minister (William Collins) by Alan Duncan: “As with all ministerial diaries, this one was vetted, and one gets a faint occasional sense of something missing in the background – if only an explanation of why the author spends so much time in the Gulf state of Oman.” Also, Dreamland by Rosa Rankin-Gee: “Dreamland brings us face-to-face with much of what we’re on the threshold of losing; nevertheless, it manages to convince us that its characters have everything still to live for.

Shelf Awareness reviews Mergers and Acquisitions: Or, Everything I Know About Love I Learned on the Wedding Pages (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin) by Cate Doty: “With self-deprecating wit, wry humor and a keen eye for details both ridiculous and heartwarming, Mergers and Acquisitions is a snapshot of a particular era in both journalism and the wedding industry as well as a thoughtful meditation on love itself.”

Tor.com reviews Floodpath (Harper Voyager: HarperCollins) by Emily B. Martin: “Floodpath brings together some familiar elements—palace intrigue, an unlikely figure with a royal birthright, a group of young heroes facing impossible odds—but finds largely unpredictable ways to let them play out.”

Slate reviews Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty (Doubleday) by Patrick Radden Keefe: “Although the material in Empire of Pain is more complex and less action-packed than the crimes and terrorism of Say Nothing, the narrative is just as involving. Keefe has a knack for crafting lucid, readable descriptions of the sort of arcane business arrangements the Sacklers favored.”

Autostraddle reviews Malice by Heather Walter (Del Rey: Ballantine): “The dark fairytale re-telling has become an established fantasy sub-genre in its own right, and Malice’s sweet lesbian love story and bitter realities are a more than worthy addition.”

The Seattle Times reviews Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner (Knopf): “This story is a nuanced portrayal of a young person grappling with what it means to embody familial and cultural histories, to be fueled by creative pursuits, to examine complex relationships with place, and to endure the acute pain of losing a parent just on the other side of a tumultuous adolescence.”

BookMark picks "The Best Reviewed Books of the Week."

Briefly Noted

USA Today announces Oprah Winfrey’s upcoming book tour and April 27 release of her new book What Happened to You (Flatiron Books: Macmillan) centering trauma, resilience, and healing. People also covers this story. Also, Terry Crews discusses the new audiobook Stronger Together (Audible), co-written with his wife with lessons from his life and marriage. Ebony also covers this story.

Entertainment Weekly gives a teaser about George R.R. Martin’s possible continuation of The Winds of Winter and updates on the author’s other creative projects. Also, a cover reveal, for the next Outlander novel Go Tell The Bees That I Am Gone (Recorded Books), there is also an excerpt, and a Starz commitment to a 7th season. The book is due out on Nov 23. EW also has an interview with Donnetta Lavinia Grays, a Whiting Award Winner, on reflecting on the growth of her creativity.

The Guardian reports that author Ahmet Altan has been released from prison in Turkey.

LitHub creates a list of 6 Latin American Novels That Changed How We Think of Fiction and 6 inevitable deaths in literature. Also, an interview with Paul Theroux, author of Under the Wave at Waimea, (Houghton Harcourt) about defeating writer’s block and favorite rereads. LitHub also features "How Black Queer Readers and Writers Nourish the Future."

JSTOR Daily gives insight on how a previous pandemic impacted libraries, librarians, and their communities

The Hollywood Reporter interviews Phoebe Robinson, author of Please Don't Sit On My Bed In Your Outside Clothes (Tiny Reparations: Random House) about the lack of diversity in publishing among other topics.

Publishing Perspectives reports that At the End of the Matinee (Amazon Crossing) by Keiichio Hirano leads World Book Day Titles.

Tor.com announces N.K. Jemisin’s MasterClass and provides an excerpt from In Deeper Waters (Margaret K. McElderry: S. & S.) by F.T. Lukens.

People covers John Boehner’s On the House: A Washington Memoir (St. Martin’s: Macmillan) thoughts about the state of America’s government from his point of view. Also, an announcement of an Audrey Hepburn biography, Warrior by Robert Matzen (GoodKnight Books: Independent Publishers Books), to be published on Sept 28. There is also an interview with HGTV designer and first time author Jasmine Roth about the upcoming House Story (Ten Speed Press: Random House).

Refinery29 makes recommendations on historical romance novels for Bridgerton fans.

Popsugar has a list of 15 Underrated Romance Books and Caroline Kepnes, author of You Love Me (Random House), participates in a live q & a session.

Vogue interviews Mira Sethi on her first book, Are You Enjoying? (Knopf: Random House) about living a transcontinental life and how it has affected her identity.

Booklist issues a top 10 selections for women’s fiction in print and audio.

The Bookseller announces Frankie Bridge’s Brazen will be published by New Octopus imprint Brazen about mental health, Headline will publish Voices, Aasmah Mir’s memoir, and dicusses the continued success of Jojo Moyes’ Still Me (Penguin: Random House).

Jezebel raises concerns about a police officer’s book regarding the killing of Breonna Taylor.

NYPL celebrates Immigrant Heritage Week with a list of books for Slavic New York.

Amazon Book Review lists Best biographies and memoirs of April, a weekly recommendation, and “What to read next if you loved The Midnight Library.” 

Bomb Magazine interviews Ethan Rutherford, author of Farthest South (A Strange Object: Deep Vellum Publishing) about the art of storytelling.

CrimeReads interviews William Boyle, author of forthcoming Shoot the Moonlight Out (Pegasus: S. & S.) about the work of writing and creating a routine. Also, an interview with Lawrence P. Jackson, author of a biography on Chester B. Himes (W. W. Norton) on the importance of black crime writers.

Authors on Air

LitHub reveals a complete trailer for Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad (Anchor: Penguin). The series is set to premiere on May 14 on Prime Video. Tor.com and Shadow and Act also report.

NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Beth Allison Barr, author of The Making of Biblical Womanhood: How the Subjugation of Women Became Gospel Truth (Brazos Press: Baker Publishing Group) about the importance of women religious leaders

C-SPAN2’s After Words interviews Lisa Genova, author of Remember (Harmony), on how neuroscience explains memory.

Jimmy Kimmel features Hunter Biden, author of Beautiful Things: A Memoir (Gallery: S. & S.), in an interview on Friday, April 16.

PBS NewsHour’s Now Read This publishes a full transcript of an interview with Jessica Bruder, author of Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century (W. W. Norton; LJ starred review).

Deadline announces a television series based on Greyboy: Finding Blackness In A White World (Arcade: S. & S.) by Cole Brown, developed by Yara and Keri Shahidi for ABC Signature.

Popsugar gives spoilers for the new thriller coming to Netflix on April 29 based on Elizabeth Brundage’s All Things Cease to Appear (Vintage: Random House).


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