New to the Bestseller Lists, Dec. 6, 2018 | Book Pulse

Kingdom of the Blind: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny leads the new books on the bestsellers lists. The Golden Globe nominations are out, with some book-related picks. Michelle Obama answers the NYT's By the Book questions. More best books arrive and Vulture looks at the year in publishing.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]








Fiction

Kingdom of the Blind: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny (Minotaur: Macmillan; LJ starred review): Debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Tom Clancy Oath of Office by Marc Cameron (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin): Lands at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Trump's Enemies: How the Deep State Is Undermining the Presidency by Corey R. Lewandowski, David N. Bossie (Center Street: Hachette): Opens at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Audio

Past Tense: A Jack ReacherNovel by Lee Child, read by Scott Brick (Random House Audio) is No. 1 on the December NYT Audio Fiction Best Sellers list while Becoming written and read by Michelle Obama (Random House Audio) is No. 1 on the December NYT Audio Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Bringing Down the Colonel: A Sex Scandal of the Gilded Age, and the "Powerless" Woman Who Took On Washington by Patricia Miller (Sarah Crichton: Macmillan): "What Miller depicts so well are the larger cultural changes that bore down on the case, even if whatever emancipation was set in motion remains unfinished still."

The Washington Post reviews Come with Me by Helen Schulman (Harper): "delves into the interplay of technology and relationships with edgy, upsetting and tragic results. And yet, the story is also warm, wise and witty." Also, Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield (Atria/Emily Bestler: S. & S.; LJ starred review): "eerily mystic."

NPR reviews The Game: Harvard, Yale, and America in 1968 by George Howe Colt (Scribner: S. & S.): "fascinating." Also, Revolution Sunday by Wendy Guerra, translated by Achy Obejas (Melville House): "a complicated book, and a challenging one. It mixes poetry and prose, autofiction and hyperrealism, intense sensory detail and complete logistical vagueness ... more vivid than life." Parallel Lives by Olivier Schrauwen (Fantagraphics: W.W. Norton): "mischievous and mystifying."

The L.A. Times reviews Insurrecto by Gina Apostol (Soho: Random House): "stunning."

Best Books of 2018







Vulture picks its 10 Best Books of 2018. Motherhood by Sheila Heti (Henry Holt: Macmillan) tops the list.

Eater says that the Cookbook of the Year is Solo: A Modern Cookbook for a Party of One by Anita Lo (Knopf).

BookRiot lists "Rioters' Favorite Mysteries, Thrillers, and True Crime of 2018."

Briefly Noted

Vulture looks at the year in Trump books. And, in fiction, says that 2018 was "the Year of the Woman."

LitHub lists "The Biggest Nonfiction Bestsellers Of The Last 100 Years."

Book Marks has more of its "best reviewed books of the year" lists, this time rounding-up Literature in Translation and Graphic Literature.

USA Today picks coffee-table books for gift giving.

Bon Appétit has a "Cookbook Gift Guide." The magazine also has started a book club/cooking club and this month's pick is the original Entertaining by Martha Stewart (Clarkson Potter: Random House).

Paste picks the best YA books of December.

BuzzFeed features 9 YA authors on how Twilight "changed YA forever."

The NYT has "3 Books About George H.W. Bush's Legacy."

In forthcoming book news, Timothy Zahn will pen a third book in his Star Wars "Thrawn" set, to be titled Thrawn: Treason (Del Rey: Random House).StarWars.comhas the news and cover.

Tor.com offers a reading guide to Ray Bradbury.

Michelle Obama answers the NYT's By the Book questions.

The Washington Post considers works of the 1890s, a decade the paper says is having "a literary moment."

The Guardian reports on the upcoming exhibition of manga to be held by the British Museum.

The NYTcelebrates A Christmas Carol as it celebrates it 175th anniversary.

Authors on Air

The Golden Globe nominations for 2019 are out, with a number of book-based picks.

NPR's All Things Considered is starting a series in which authors share the books they will be gifting this season. Tayari Jones goes first. Also offering favorite picks is Lynn Neary who covers books for NPR.

Deadline Hollywood reports adaptation news: Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Other Four-Letter Words by Michael Ausiello (Atria: S. & S.) is headed to the movies, with Jim Parsons to star. You Me Everything by Catherine Isaac (Pamela Dorman: Penguin) is set for the movies too. Also getting ready for the big screen is The Devil Soldier: The American Soldier of Fortune Who Became a God in China by Caleb Carr (Random House).

Clueless the film is getting adapted into Clueless, The Musical (both are based on Jane Austen's Emma). The NYT has details.

Vanity Fair has some thoughts about Game of Thrones.

Tor.com reports that American Gods season 2 will begin airing on March 10, 2019.

Bernie Sanders, Where We Go from Here: Two Years in the Resistance (Thomas Dunne: Macmillan) will be on TheLate Show with Stephen Colbert tonight.

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