Run Your Week: Big Books, Sure Bets, & Titles Making News, Nov. 25, 2018 | Book Pulse

Kingdom of the Blind: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny leads holds this week. Becoming by Michelle Obama is the bestselling book of the week. The Costa Book Awards shortlists are out. Lee Child says the Reacher films with Tom Cruise are no more. The series will move to "Long-form streaming television, with a completely new actor." The NYPL gets in on Black Friday shopping.

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Big Books of the Week

Kingdom of the Blind: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny (Minotaur: Macmillan; LJ starred review) leads holds this week.

Other titles in demand include:

Robert B. Parker's Blood Feud by Mike Lupica (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin)

Someone to Trust by Mary Balogh (Berkley: Penguin)

Tom Clancy Oath of Office by Marc Cameron (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin)

The Other Wife by Michael Robotham (Sphere: Hachette)

Librarians and Booksellers Suggest

Four new Library Reads choices publish this week:

How Long 'til Black Future Month?: Stories by N. K. Jemisin (Orbit: Hachette):

“This first short story collection from the most celebrated speculative fiction author of our time features her signature blend of sharply observed, provocative tales of magic steeped in realism and social commentary. Both SFF fans and adventurous readers of genre-blending literary fiction such as Station Eleven and The Underground Railroad will find much to admire.” — Annabelle Mortensen, Skokie Public Library, Skokie, IL

Someone to Trust by Mary Balogh (Berkley: Penguin; LJ starred review):

“Love defies societal expectations in this historical romance set in the Regency period. For fans of Tessa Dare and Amelia Grey.” — Kathy Setter, Indianhead Federated Library System, Eau Claire, WI

 

The Adults by Caroline Hulse (Random House):

“Divorced couple Claire and Matt devise a terrific idea for Christmas: spend it at Happy Forest Holiday Park with their new partners and their seven-year-old daughter Scarlett (and her imaginary friend). Hilarious and heartrending, this debut novel asks the age-old question: ‘What could possibly go wrong?'” — Todd Krueger, Baltimore County Public Library, Towson, MD

It is also an Indie Next pick:

“What a fun read! Put a copy into the stocking of every adult family member (and rejoice when they all go off to their separate corners to read quietly). Exes, step-parents, vacation hijinks, secrets, and screw-ups — this funny novel has all the right ingredients to entertain and cut the tension surrounding big family holidays.” — Mary Laura Philpott, Parnassus Books, Nashville, TN

Kingdom of the Blind: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny (Minotaur: Macmillan; LJ starred review) (Hall of Fame):

“Gamache tries to understand why someone connected to a mysterious will is killed, while he and Beauvoir race against time to stop a deadly shipment of drugs from hitting the streets. Penny digs deep into her familiar characters in what may be her most personal book.” — David Singleton, Charlotte Mecklenberg Public Library, Charlotte, NC

It too is an Indie Next pick:

“Inspector Gamache has puzzled his way through 13 of Louise Penny’s mysteries, and his 14th is an exceptional read. Penny brings us a mystery that will delight old-school mystery lovers (a storm, the reading of a will) as well as those who enjoy a fast-paced thriller (Gamache’s plans involving the opioids he lost). The pacing is swift and the cast of characters from Three Pines is as charming and wonderful as always. The Kingdom of the Blind is easily one of the best of the series. Thank you, Louise Penny, for reminding us that kindness does exist in this mostly cruel world and that when utilized correctly, it can be inspiring and life-changing.” —William Carl, Wellesley Books, Wellesley, MA

There are three additional Indie Next selections:

The Museum of Modern Love by Heather Rose (Algonquin Books: Workman; LJ starred review):

“Fascinating fiction based on the true story of artist Marina Abramović’s 2010 art performance in which she sat face-to-face, eye-to-eye, with museum visitors, one at a time, for 75 days. She sat unmoving, in the same pose every day, her expression unchanged except for occasional tears. The performance had surprisingly deep effects on both visitors who sat with her and visitors who simply observed. The story focuses on several fictional characters’ almost-obsessive attraction to the performance and its subsequent influence on their lives. Not unlike the apparent enchantment of the performance, it was hard to tear my eyes from the page.” — Kay Wosewick, Boswell Book Company, Milwaukee, WI

What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape by Sohaila Abdulali (The New Press):

What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape is a public square for those who know a lot about rape and for those who know little. It is a safe space for survivors and a broad-minded attempt to open the conversation to everyone. It’s a global book, relevant in refugee camps and American suburbs. I can’t think of a book to compare it to. Maybe Silent Spring or Unsafe at Any Speed. I hope the world is ready to accept the change this book could bring.” — Sarah McNally, McNally Jackson Books, New York, NY

Come with Me by Helen Schulman (Harper):

“A gripping, expertly written story of love and fate, Helen Schulman’s Come With Me resonates for all of us who are engaged in our modern, complex families; intrigued and confused by the technology in our lives; and curious enough to wonder how our lives might have turned out if we had made different choices.” — Linda Kass, Gramercy Books, Bexley, OH

 

 

 

New to the Bestseller Lists

Catching up from the holiday weekend, below are the new bestsellers.

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

Fiction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Look Alive Twenty-Five: A Stephanie Plum Novel by Janet Evanovich (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin): Opens at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Long Road to Mercy by David Baldacci (Grand Central: Hachette): Debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald - The Original Screenplay by J.K. Rowling, illustrated by MinaLima (Arthur A. Levine Books: Scholastic): Casts a spell at No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Becoming by Michelle Obama (Crown: Random House): Debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Let's Go (So We Can Get Back): A Memoir of Recording and Discording with Wilco, Etc. by Jeff Tweedy (Dutton: Penguin; LJ starred review): Rocks on to the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 6.

It's Not Supposed to Be This Way: Finding Unexpected Strength When Disappointments Leave You Shattered by Lysa TerKeurst (Thomas Nelson: Harper): Lands at No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

In The Media

Becoming by Michelle Obama (Crown: Random House) leads the book coverage in Entertainment Weekly and gets a B review. My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (Doubleday: Random House) gets a B+ and a feature. The online story EW ran last week about book awards gets in the print issue. InsideBlack Mirror: The Inside Story by Charlie Brooker, Annabel Jones, Jason Arnopp (Crown Archetype: Random House) lands on the "Must List" along with HBO's My Brilliant Friend and Fire & Blood: 300 Years Before A Game of Thrones (A Targaryen History) by George R. R. Martin, illustrated by Doug Wheatley (Bantam: Random House). In a story about the American Film Institute AFI Fest, EW features Bird Box and Mary Queen of Scots. In other screen news, with some book/comic connections, there is a feature on the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, a first look at "Elseworlds" (the three-night CW feature with The Flash, Green Arrow, and Supergirl), and an interview with Leah Remini on season three of Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath. Finally, the magazine remembers Stan Lee.

Tony's Wife by Adriana Trigiani (Harper) is People's "Book of the Week." Also in "The Best New Books" are Kingdom of the Blind: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel by Louise Penny (Minotaur: Macmillan; LJ starred review) and Those Who Knew by Idra Novey (Viking: Penguin). Michael Caine, Blowing the Bloody Doors Off: And Other Lessons in Life (Hachette), gets a feature. EMILY: The Cookbook by Emily Hyland, Matthew Hyland (Ballantine: Random House) stars in the food section.

Reviews

Lisa Scottoline reviews Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty (Flatiron: Macmillan) for the NYT: "it is thought-provoking but never pedantic." Elissa Schappell reviews A Ladder to the Sky by John Boyne (Hogarth: Random House): writing that the story "regrettably [move] away from its promising beginning as a comic novel satirizing the literary world, and toward the realm of simple satire, which glories in cliché and antic cruelty." Weike Wang reviews The Lonesome Bodybuilder: Stories by Yukiko Motoya, translated by Asa Yoneda (Soft Skull Press): "delightful ... The writing itself is to be admired." Also, The War Before the War: Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle for America's Soul from the Revolution to the Civil War by Andrew Delbanco (Penguin; LJ starred review): "riveting, unsettling." Hungover: The Morning After and One Man's Quest for the Cure by Shaughnessy Bishop-Stall (Penguin): "has an effect not unlike recovering from food poisoning or slipping into a warm house on a frigid night. You turn the pages thinking, 'Thank God I don’t feel like that right now.' Or maybe, 'Thank God I’m not this guy.'” "The Shortlist" considers debut story collections. The "Children's Books" column gathers books about Hanukkah. There is also a dual review of debut dystopian novels.

The Washington Post reviews Wrecked by Joe Ide (Mulholland Books: Hachette): "confirms that he’s among the most original new voices in today’s crime fiction." Also, Handsome Johnny: The Life and Death of Johnny Rosselli: Gentleman Gangster, Hollywood Producer, CIA Assassin by Lee Server (St. Martin's: Macmillan): "undoubtedly worth the price of admission." After Emily: Two Remarkable Women and the Legacy of America's Greatest Poet by Julie Dobrow (W.W. Norton; LJ starred review): "mesmerizing."

NPR reviews Hardly Children: Stories by Laura Adamczyk (FSG: Macmillan): "at times eerie, often spare, and contain uncomfortable examinations of childhood, adulthood, gender, and whiteness." Also, Heirs of the Founders: The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun and Daniel Webster, the Second Generation of American Giants by H. W. Brands (Doubleday: Random House; LJ starred review): "brings to life a transitional era of American politics when the scope and power of the federal government was unknown, as were the boundaries of the United States."My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (Doubleday: Random House): "wry ... sparse ... [with a] sour, sly heart." The Houseguest: And Other Stories by Amparo Dávila, translated by Matthew Gleeson and Audrey Harris (New Directions: W.W. Norton): "at her best, Dávila radiates an interesting sense of unease and calamity ... for a very long time, women have sought comfort in the darkness when their own lives were full of quiet despair. It is this silent scream which permeates The Houseguest. "

The L.A. Times reviews Those Who Knew by Idra Novey (Viking: Penguin): "mesmerizing." Also Civilizing Torture: An American Tradition by W. Fitzhugh Brundage (Belknap Press: Harvard Univ.; LJ starred review): "Brundage’s point is to contextualize the self-serving arguments around enhanced interrogation into a longer history of colonial, settler, military and police torture. Abu Ghraib was by no means an outlier."

Briefly Noted

The Costa Book Awards shortlists are out.

USA Today picks its books of the week.

NPR looks at the college common reading program.

The NYT "Inside the List" considers the scale of how well Becoming is doing and explores the history of best of the year lists.

The Washington Post highlights books about gratitude.

The StarTribune selects holiday books.

Tom Baker is writing a novel, based on a Doctor Who script. io9 has details.

The Atlantic features The Lonesome Bodybuilder: Stories by Yukiko Motoya, translated by Asa Yoneda (Soft Skull Press), writing that the stories range "in tone from ominous thrillers to lighthearted folktales, but they always seem to return to a depletion of self."

Timeexcerpts Black Flags, Blue Waters: The Epic History of America's Most Notorious Pirates by Eric Jay Dolin (Liveright: W.W. Norton).

Bleeding Cool reports that Abrams has canceled the upcoming Dave McKean's A Suicide Bomber Sits in the Library.

JSTOR Daily reports on the Nancy Drew syndicate.

The NYPL gets in on Black Friday shopping.

Vultureinterviews Oyinkan Braithwaite, My Sister, the Serial Killer (Doubleday: Random House).

The GuardianinterviewsMeg Wolitzer. Also, a feature onJonathan Ames and an interview with Kiese Laymon Heavy: An American Memoir (Scribner: S. & S.; LJ starred review).

Bitch Mediainterviews Kristen R. Ghodsee, Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism: And Other Arguments for Economic Independence (Nation Books: Hachette).

James H. Billington, the former Librarian of Congress and author, has died. It was a terrible weekend for such news: Author Donald McCaig has died. Author Janet Paisley has died. Bernard Glassman, American Buddhist teacher and author, has died. The NYT has obituaries.

 

Authors on Air

The NYT explores the use of poetry in the film The Kindergarten Teacher. The paper also looks at the "porous" borders between TV and novels.

Lee Child says the Reacher films with Tom Cruise are no more. The series will move to "Long-form streaming television, with a completely new actor." This because fans think that "Cruise, for all his talent, didn’t have [the necessary] physicality." The Guardian reports.

The artistic director of London's Young Vic theater is adapting The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by C.L.R. James (Vintage: Random House) for a 10-part TV series. Deadline Hollywood has the story, along with a new first look image from the forthcoming The ABC Murders series.

Thanks A Thousand: A Gratitude Journey by A. J. Jacobs (S. & S./TED) features on CBS Sunday Morning.

After, based on After by Anna Todd (Gallery Books: S. & S.), gets a trailer.

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Author Image
Neal Wyatt

Neal Wyatt is LJ's reader's advisory columnist. She writes The Reader's Shelf, RA Crossroads, Book Pulse, and Wyatt's World columns. She is currently revising The Readers' Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2018). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com.

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