Comics Dominate the News, Nov. 7, 2018 | Book Pulse

Lucia Berlin continues to get buzz and the very long nomination lists for both the CILIP Greenaway Medal and the Carnegie Medal nominations are out. A brief first look at the forthcoming Greta Gerwig adaptation of Little Women has arrived. Roald Dahl did not get a commemorative coin due to his anti-Semitic views.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Comics News

Entertainment Weekly reports on how graphic novels are "revitalizing classics - and pushing diversity." Also, an excerpt (written by Sting) of the introduction toJohn Constantine, Hellblazer: 30th Anniversary Celebration (Vertigo: Random House).

The NYT reports on a new exhibition at the Library of Congress of comics, toys, and other objects of pop culture. The story has images of some of the highlights. The paper also has a story on the sale of a story from EC Comics "Master Race." Right now the estimate is $150,000.

DC has cast the lead roles in its adaptation of the comic Swamp Thing, Andy Bean as Alec Holland and Derek Mears as the Swamp Thing. Entertainment Weekly has details.

The comic Survivors’ Club is headed to TV. Deadline Hollywood has the story.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Chalk: The Art and Erasure of Cy Twombly by Joshua Rivkin (Melville House: Random): "He scrapes up what he can, but very little is new, or surprising ... longs for a little scrutiny along with the adoration." Also, Reagan: An American Journey by Bob Spitz (Penguin): "traces ... the full arc of the man’s life and career, telling the story of how he leveraged his strengths of personality and clearheadedness to compensate for his weaknesses." Viet Thanh Nguyen reviews The Souls of Yellow Folk: Essays by Wesley Yang (Norton): "Yang thus leaves the reader stranded with him in his ambivalence about what it means, if anything, to be “yellow.” His book, which calls out and to yellow folks but is only partially concerned with us, is as lukewarm as the racial grievance he senses and feels."

The Washington Post reviews Why Religion?: A Personal Story by Elaine Pagels (Ecco: Harper): "a personal story, but it’s also a wide-ranging work of cultural reflection and a brisk tour of the most exciting religion scholarship over the past 40 years." Also, Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty (Flatiron: Macmillan): "whether you enjoy this novel or find it confounding will largely come down to whether you feel you’re in on the joke or that it’s being made at your expense."

USA Today reviews Solace Island by Meg Tilly (Berkley: Penguin), giving the romance novel three out of four stars and writing it is "a romantic thriller with a clever ending."

NPR reviews Why Religion?: A Personal Story by Elaine Pagels (Ecco: Harper), writing that she answers the question of her title with "because we suffer and need help."

Briefly Noted

The NYT suggests YA fantasy novels that "Sweep Readers Away."

The Guardian picks the "Top 10 modern Victorian novels."

Elle has 23 authors discuss "Their Solace Reading for Difficult Times."

Vulture considers "Why Lucia Berlin Matters More to Us Today Than She Did During Her Lifetime."

LJ lists the starred reviews for November.

The Guardianinterviews Liane Moriarty.

HuffPosthas a pictorial interview with Liana Finck, Passing for Human: A Graphic Memoir (Random House).

Alice Quinn is stepping down as executive director of The Poetry Society of America. The NYT has a report.

In the UK, The Guardian reports that a commemorative coin to celebrate the life of Roald Dahl was cancelled due to "concerns about the author’s antisemitic views."

Both the CILIP Greenaway Medal and the Carnegie Medal nominations are out. These are the very long lists honoring the best book and the best illustration for children's literature. Their website describes them as "the UK's oldest and most prestigious children's book awards. Often described by authors and illustrators as 'the one they want to win' - they are the gold standard in children's literature."

Authors on Air

Vanity Fair has a brief look at the forthcoming Greta Gerwig adaptation of Little Women.

Entertainment Weeklyinterviews Claire Foy about the look of The Girl in the Spider's Web.

Paste reports on the stage adaptation of Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds (Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books: S. & S.; SLJ starred review).

The Neil Gaiman backed adaptation of Mervyn Peake’s Gormenghast novels has its writer, Toby Whithouse, from Doctor Who. The Shepherd Who Didn’t Run: Father Stanley Rother, Martyr from Oklahoma by Maria Ruiz Scaperlanda is headed to the movies. Deadline Hollywood has the details on both stories.

Rebecca Traister, Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger (S. & S.), will be on The Daily Show tonight.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.

RELATED 

TOP STORIES

LIBRARY EDUCATION

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

COMMUNITY FORM

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

Get connected. Join our global community of more than 200,000 librarians and educators.