Barack Obama’s 'A Promised Land' To Publish Nov. 17 | Book Pulse

Barack Obama’s memoir will publish on Nov. 17 and will be titled A Promised Land. The National Book Foundation announces the longlists for the Translated Literature category and the Young People’s Literature category. Anxious People by Fredrik Backman and Disloyal by Michael Cohen top the bestseller lists. Piranesi by Susanna Clarke remains buzzy.

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New Barack Obama Book

Barack Obama’s memoir will publish on Nov. 17 and will be titled A Promised Land. It runs 768 pages and is the first of two volumes. This one covers events up to 2011. Crown (PRH) is planning a first print run of 3 million copies and will release it in 25 languages. The ISBN is 9781524763169. The NYT has more details.

In additional forthcoming book news, James S.A. Corey’s The Expanse series will end with Leviathan Falls, out in 2021 from Orbit Books. Also, news that We Are Satellites by Sarah Pinsker (Berkley: Penguin) comes out in May 2021. Tor.com has a reports on both.

Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney has a book coming May 2, Good Company (Ecco). The ISBN is 9780062876003. Lit Hub has a few early details.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Anxious People by Fredrik Backman (Atria Books: S. & S.; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Shadows in Death by J. D. Robb (St. Martin's Press: Macmillan) arrives at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

One by One by Ruth Ware (Gallery/Scout: Macmillan; LJ starred review) takes No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Darkest Evening: A Vera Stanhope Novel by Ann Cleeves (Minotaur: Macmillan) holds No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Disloyal: A Memoir: The True Story of the Former Personal Attorney to President Donald J. Trump by Michael Cohen (Skyhorse: S. & S.) debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Killing Crazy Horse: The Merciless Indian Wars in America by Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt: Macmillan) lands at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Everything Beautiful in Its Time: Seasons of Love and Loss by Jenna Bush Hager (William Morrow: Harper) celebrates lives lived at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day by Jay Shetty (S. & S.) claims No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Compromised: Counterintelligence and the Threat of Donald J. Trump by Peter Strzok (HMH) lays it out at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Speaking for Myself: Faith, Freedom, and the Fight of Our Lives Inside the Trump White House by Sarah Huckabee Sanders (St. Martin’s Press: Macmillan) holds No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list with the bulk order indicator.

Eat a Peach: A Memoir by David Chang, Gabe Ulla (Clarkson Potter: Random House) closes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 13.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Daniel Tatum (Basic Books: Hachette): No. 12 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews What Are You Going Through by Sigrid Nunez (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review): “disconcerting … It will meditate — at length, in earnest, often graphically — upon whatever life, death and love can presently mean.”

NPR reviews The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War by David Nasaw (Penguin; LJ starred review): “insightful and eye-opening.” Also, Here We Are by Graham Swift (Knopf): “a paragon of the magic of compressed narration.”

The NYT has a dual review of books about “Black Boyhood and Its Superpowers.”

Book Marks has “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

The National Book Foundation announces the longlist for its Translated Literature category. The Longlist is also out for Young People’s Literature. SLJ has coverage.

The NYT has a story about how the Booker Prize shortlist was picked during the pandemic.

Barbara Hoffert has new “Prepub Alert” columns in LJ.

BuzzFeed picks six books for the week.

The Index of Self-Destructive Acts by Christopher Beha (Tin House; LJ starred review) is BuzzFeed’s October book club title.

Entertainment Weekly interviews Chang-rae Lee, My Year Abroad (Riverhead: Penguin).

Michael Ian Black, A Better Man: A (Mostly Serious) Letter to My Son (Algonquin: Workman), features in the NYT’s “By the Book” column and Yaa Gyasi, Transcendent Kingdom (Knopf; LJ starred review) features in the “Inside the List” column.

The NYPL showcases Xuan Juliana Wang, author of Home Remedies (Hogarth: Random House), and one of the library’s Young Lions Fiction Award Finalists.

Electric Lit, Vox, The Guardian, and Tor.com consider Piranesi by Susanna Clarke (Bloomsbury USA: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

The CBC interviews Emma Donoghue, The Pull of the Stars (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Tor.com excerpts The Half-God of Rainfall by Inua Ellams (Fourth Estate: Harper).

Open Culture reports on the book cover re-creations of Matt Stevens of “Good Movies as Old Books” series of art works.

Stanley Crouch has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Watchmen wins four Creative Arts Emmys. The Mandalorian wins big as well. Deadline reports.

Killing Eve gets a fourth season. The Morning Show gets a second season. Town & Country reports.

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