Alyssa Cole, Ivy Pochoda, and More Among Nominees for the 2021 Edgar Awards | Book Pulse

Nominees for the 2021 Edgar Allan Poe Awards are out, and include When No One Is Watching by Alyssa Cole, These Women by Ivy Pochoda, Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch, and many more. See the winners of the Alex Awards, the Printz Award, and all the other 2021 ALA youth media award honorees. Forthcoming book news includes an essay collection edited by Tarana Burke, an instructional tome on talking dogs, and the Dragonlance trilogy. Plus, HBO Max is looking to develop a live-action Harry Potter series.

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Awards Season

Nominees for the 2021 Edgar Allan Poe Awards are out, and include When No One Is Watching by Alyssa Cole (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review), These Women by Ivy Pochoda (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review), Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch (Random House; LJ starred review), and many more. The ceremony for the 75th annual awards from the Mystery Writers of America, which honor the best in mystery and non-fiction books, as well as television, is scheduled for April 29.

The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune (Tor: Macmillan), Plain Bad Heroines by emily m. danforth (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review), Kent State: Four Dead in Ohio by Derf Backderf (Harry N. Abrams; LJ starred review), and more win Alex Awards, and Everything Sad Is Untrue: (a true story) by Daniel Nayeri (Levine Querido; SLJ starred review) wins the 2021 Printz Award. All the 2021 ALA youth media award winners are listed here.

Reviews

The NYT reviews No Heaven for Good Boys by Keisha Bush (Random House): "Bush walks that line — portraying the bad without aggrandizement and illuminating the good without sentimentality." Also, Mike Nichols: A Life by Mark Harris (Penguin): "He was a man in perpetual motion, and Harris chases him with patience, clarity and care." Let Me Tell You What I Mean by Joan Didion (Knopf: Random House): "...funny and touching, roving and no-nonsense." We Came, We Saw, We Left: A Family Gap Year by Charles Wheelan (W. W. Norton): "What I liked best about the book was watching two people parent their teenagers well." We Need to Hang Out: A Memoir of Making Friends by Billy Baker (Avid Reader: S. & S.): "...an entertaining mix of social science, memoir and humor." The Price You Pay for College: An Entirely New Road Map for the Biggest Financial Decision Your Family Will Ever Make by Ron Lieber (Harper): "It is comprehensive and detailed without being tedious, practical without being banal, impeccably well judged and unusually rigorous." Religion and the Rise of Capitalism by Benjamin M. Friedman (Knopf: Random House; LJ starred review): "As one reads Friedman, words like 'magisterial, 'masterpiece' and 'magnificent' floated through my thoughts."

The L.A. Times reviews City of a Thousand Gates by Rebecca Sacks (Harper): "Sacks skillfully balances her characters’ daily dramas and relationships — crushes, parents, siblings, engagements, babies and sex — with the ever-present hum of underlying ideology and potential violence." 

The Washington Post reviews Trio by William Boyd (Knopf: Random House; LJ starred review): "...the movie Boyd has made of them may not be Bergman or even Capra, but it is, as I began by saying, diverting."

Briefly Noted

Bustle picks the 10 best books of the week.

The Millions lists notable books out this week.

The NYT recommends several new releases.

Book Riot previews this year's best YA books.

Barbara Hoffert has new Prepub Alert columns in LJ

Maria Shriver is launching the imprint The Open Field at Penguin Life. O: The Oprah Magazine has details.

Tarana Burke, the activist who started the Me Too movement, announced a book of essays she's co-edited, You Are Your Best Thing: Vulnerability, Shame Resilience, and the Black Experience (Random House). It's due out April 28.

Christina Hunger (and Stella) announced on Instagram that her book How Stella Learned to Talk: The Groundbreaking Story of the World's First Talking Dog (William Morrow: HarperCollins) is due out May 4.

Following a dropped lawsuit, Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman will release a new Dungeons & Dragons trilogy. Polygon reports that a release date for the first of the new Dragonlance books (Del Ray: Random House) is expected later this year.

Tor.com has an excerpt of The Theft of Sunlight by Intisar Khanani (HarperTeen), which is due out March 23.

The Rumpus has a conversation with Fariha Róisín, Like a Bird (Unnamed).

Sarah Jaffe, Work Won't Love You Back: How Devotion to Our Jobs Keeps Us Exploited, Exhausted, and Alone (Bold Type: Hachette; LJ starred review), speaks with Time about capitalism

Elle has a Q&A with Salamishah Tillet, In Search of The Color Purple: The Story of an American Masterpiece (Abrams).

The New Yorker features Let Me Tell You What I Mean by Joan Didion (Knopf: Random House).

Denise Hamilton discusses editing the new anthology Speculative Los Angeles (Akashic) with the L.A. Times.

Entertainment Weekly interviews Nancy Johnson, The Kindest Lie (William Morrow: HarperCollins).

Dario Diofebi, Paradise, Nevada (Bloomsbury: Macmillan), talks about teaching writing on Electric Lit.

Pauline Harmange, I Hate Men (Fourth Estate: HarperCollins), discusses French feminism with The Daily Beast.

As part of the celebration of its 125th anniversary, the NYT Book Review revisits reviews by 25 great thinkers and writers.

The Washington Post profiles a book club in New Mexico that organized a pop-up vaccine clinic.

The NYT talks with Jesse Sheidlower about the free, online resource, Historical Dictionary of Science Fiction.

Authors on Air

There's a new trailer for The Underground Railroad, based on the book by Colson Whitehead.

HBO Max is looking to develop a live-action Harry Potter series. The Hollywood Reporter has details.

A six-hour series adaptation of In With the Devil by James Keene is in the works at Apple TV+. Deadline reports.

The Keen On podcast speaks with Michael Lind, The New Class War: Saving Democracy from the Managerial Elite (Portfolio: Penguin).

John Colapinto talks about This Is the Voice (S. & S.) on NPR's Fresh Air.

Stanley Tucci speaks with Good Morning America about his upcoming memoir, Taste: My Life Through Food (Gallery: S. & S.), which is due out Oct. 12.

Matthew McConaughey, Greenlights (Crown: Random House), is on with Drew Barrymore today.

Ann Patchett, The Dutch House (Harper), is on Late Night with Seth Meyers tonight.

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