Coming Soon: Adaptation of 'Game of Thrones' Prequel| Book Pulse

HBO is working on a series adaptation of Tales of Dunk and Egg by George R. R. Martin, a prequel to Game of Thrones. The 2021 Rathbones Folio Prize longlist is out and includes Just Us by Claudia Rankine, The Actual by Inua Ellams, Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart, among others. The White Tiger, Penguin Bloom, and Resident Alien are some of the adaptations premiering this week. In more adaptation news, Bridgerton, based on the series by Julia Quinn, is getting a second season.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Page to Screen

Jan. 22:

The White Tiger, based on the book by Aravind Adiga. Netflix. Reviews | Trailer

Brothers by Blood, based on the book by Pete Dexter. VOD. Reviews | Trailer

The Sister, based on Burial by Neil Cross. Hulu. Reviews | Trailer

Spoor, based on Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk. VOD. Reviews | Trailer

Jan. 26:

Penguin Bloom, based on the book by Cameron Bloom and Bradley Trevor Greive. Netflix. Reviews | Trailer

Go, Dog, Go, based on the book by P.D. Eastman. Netflix. No reviews | Trailer

Jan. 27:

Resident Alien, based on the comic by Peter Hogan and Steve Parkhouse. Syfy. No reviews | Trailer

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Nine Days: The Race to Save Martin Luther King Jr.’s Life and Win the 1960 Election by Stephen Kendrick and Paul Kendrick (FSG: Macmillan): "This book is rich in detail and ripe with cinematic potential — in parts it reads like a screenplay." Also, The Rib King by Ladee Hubbard (Amistad: HarperCollins: LJ starred review): "'The Rib King' will resonate with readers who are interested in African American history and literature, and with those who want to interrogate the emblematic American myths of progress and individual uplift." The Push by Ashley Audrain (Pamela Dorman: Penguin): "...an ingenious reincarnation of that most forbidden of suspense narratives: the mommy-in-peril-from-her-own-monstrous-offspring." The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution by James Oakes (W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): "...illuminating and accessible." Wild Rituals: 10 Lessons Animals Can Teach Us About Connection, Community, and Ourselves by Caitlin O’Connell (Chronicle Prism): "How we — animals ourselves — may benefit by paying mindful attention to rituals in our own lives is a vital message of the book." When Brains Dream: Exploring the Science and Mystery of Sleep by Antonio Zadra and Robert Stickgold (W. W. Norton): "...fascinating." Kill Switch: The Rise of the Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy by Adam Jentleson (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): "...a compelling read." A Swim in a Pond in the Rain: In Which Four Russians Give a Master Class on Writing, Reading, and Life by George Saunders (Random House): "...idiosyncratic, high-spirited way of approaching fiction."

NPR reviews The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine by Janice P. Nimura (W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): "...an important and engaging history lesson." Plus, reviews of "some of the most exciting and imperative poetry collections" of 2021.

The NYT reviews American Baby: A Mother, a Child, and the Shadow History of Adoption by Gabrielle Glaser (Viking: Penguin): "...vivid evidence that policy and culture change the trajectory of individual lives." Also, America and Iran: A History, 1720 to the Present by John Ghazvinian (Knopf: Random House): "In a breezy history, brimming with new details, Ghazvinian combines pithy descriptions and poignant anecdotes."

The L.A. Times reviews Let Me Tell You What I Mean by Joan Didion (Knopf: Random House): "...it is possible to identify which pictures, crystalline and resonant, drew Didion closer and compelled her to string words together until the molecules manifested a new truth."

Book Marks’ "Best Reviewed Books of the Week."

Briefly Noted

The 2021 Rathbones Folio Prize longlist is out. The shortlist will be announced Feb. 10.

The NYT recommends 10 recent releases

CrimeReads suggests nonfiction crime books out this month.

Entertainment Weekly has an excerpt from Getaway by Zoje Stage (Mullholand: Hachette), which is due out Aug.17.

Tor.com excerpts Silence of the Soleri by Michael Johnston (Tor: Macmillan ). It's due out Feb. 16.

The Hollywood Reporter has a preview of Home by Julio Anta and Anna Wieszczyk (Image Comics), a new superhero miniseries that addresses immigration, which debuts April 14.

Maurice Chammah discusses Let the Lord Sort Them: The Rise and Fall of the Death Penalty (Crown: Random House) with Guernica.

BuzzFeed has a Q&A with Julie Murphy, whose book Pumpkin ( Balzer + BrayHarperCollins), the final companion book to Dumplin', is due out May 25.

Martín Espada discusses his recent poetry collection, Floaters (W. W. Norton) with Lit Hub.

Elle's "Shelf Life" column features George Saunders, A Swim in a Pond in the Rain: In Which Four Russians Give a Master Class on Writing, Reading, and Life (Random House). 

Martha Teichner, When Harry Met Minnie: A True Story of Love and Friendship (Celadon: Macmillan), discusses her love of bull terriers in the NYT's "Sunday Routine" column.

Shondaland gets advice from Susan Shapiro, The Forgiveness Tour: How To Find the Perfect Apology (Skyhorse: S. & S.).

Richard Flanagan shares "The Books That Made Me" with The Guardian.

Sales of On Tyranny by Timothy Snyder and 1984 by George Orwell jumped last week. Publishers Weekly reports.

Several baked potatoes appeared on the lawn of the Wayland Free Public Library, a mystery so odd that Stephen Colbert commented about it on his show. Kirkus has details.

The NYT pays tribute to author Charles R. Saunders, who died last spring.

Authors on Air

HBO is working on a series adaptation of Tales of Dunk and Egg by George R. R. Martin, a prequel to Game of Thrones. Variety has details.

Bridgerton, based on the series by Julia Quinn, is getting a second season, according to Shondaland.

The Maris Review podcast features Mateo Askaripour, Black Buck (HMH).

Amber Ruffin and Lacey Lamar, You'll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey: Crazy Stories about Racism (Grand Central: Hachette; LJ starred review), appear on the CBC's q radio show.

The Keen On podcast talks to Johan Norberg about Open: The Story of Human Progress (Atlantic).

Slate's Outward podcast speaks with Torrey Peters, Detransition, Baby (One World: Random House). 

"We've kind of demonized sitting a little falsely," Daniel Lieberman, Exercised: Why Something We Never Evolved to Do Is Healthy and Rewarding (Pantheon: Random House), tells NPR's Fresh Air.

Michelle Buteau, Survival of the Thickest: Essays (Gallery: S. & S.), is on with Ellen DeGeneres today.

Frank Figliuzzi, The FBI Way: Inside the Bureau's Code of Excellence (Custom House: HarperCollins), appears on Real Time with Bill Maher tonight.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?