'A Court of Silver Flames' by Sarah J. Maas Tops Bestseller Lists | Book Pulse

A Court of Silver Flames by Sarah J. Maas debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list the USA Today Best-Selling Books list. In nonfiction, How to Avoid a Climate Disaster by Bill Gates starts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list. Former Beatle Paul McCartney will publish The Lyrics, a memoir of sorts with more than 900 pages across two volumes and a list price of $100, this fall. The longlist for the 2021 Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction is out. Adaptations in the works include The Silence by Don DeLillo, The Killer by Alexis Nolent, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika Sánchez, and more.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

A Court of Silver Flames by Sarah J. Maas (Bloomsbury: Macmillan) takes gold at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Missing and Endangered by J. A. Jance (William Morrow: HarperCollins) appears at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Relentless by Mark Greaney (Berkley: Penguin) starts at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need by Bill Gates (Knopf: Random House) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together by Heather McGhee (One World: Random House; LJ starred review) begins at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Black Church: This Is Our Story, This Is Our Song by Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Penguin) is No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Daughters of Kobani: A Story of Rebellion, Courage, and Justice by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon (Penguin; LJ starred review) starts at No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

NPR reviews Two Truths and a Lie: A Murder, a Private Investigator, and Her Search for Justice by Ellen McGarrahan (Random House; LJ starred review): "What sets Ellen McGarrahan's just-published true crime book, 'Two Truths and a Lie,' above so many others I've read is the moral gravity of her presence on the page and the hollow-voiced lyricism of her writing style."

The NYT reviews In Memory of Memory by Maria Stepanova (New Directions: W. W. Norton): "...any readers with a deep yearning to know more about the family who came before them will appreciate its fundamental curiosity and empathy." Also, Summer Brother by Jaap Robben and translated by David Doherty (World Editions): "This stylistic myopia works, although more character exposition could have been helpful." Love and Other Poems by Alex Dimitrov (Copper Canyon): "It fizzes like a just-opened bottle of soda." Four Lost Cities: A Secret History of the Urban Age by Annalee Newitz (W. W. Norton): "The operative lesson from the past, at least from this curated offering of former metropolises, seems to be that human culture is a plastic thing." 

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

The longlist for the 2021 Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction is out.

Vogue rounds up "The Best Books to Read in 2021."

CrimeReads suggests five debut novels out this month

Shelf Awareness previews new books out next week.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie shares Black History Month book recommendations with Amazon.

"Black Booksellers Recommend 25 Books to Read During Black History Month and Beyond" in Parade.

Former Beatle Paul McCartney will publish the memoir-ish The Lyrics (Liveright: W. W. Norton), "a deep dive into his life, based on conversations he had with the prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon" with more than 900 pages across two volumes and a list price of $100. It's due out Nov. 2. The Guardian reports.

Alix E. Harrow is working on her next novel, The Underland, which has been acquired by Tor Books. It's scheduled to release in winter 2023. Tor.com has more.

Award-winning actress and singer Cynthia Erivo will publish the picture book Remember to Dream, Ebere (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers) this Sept. The Hollywood Reporter has details.

Bustle has an excerpt from The Louder I Will Sing by Lee Lawrence (Sphere: Hachette), which is due out in the U.S. June 1.

Vulture has an excerpt from Last Call: A True Story of Lust, Love, and Murder in Queer New York by Elon Green (Celadon: Macmillan). It'll be out March 9.

Ioan Grillo discusses Blood Gun Money: How America Arms Gangs and Cartels (Bloomsbury: Macmillan) with the L.A. Times. Also, a Q&A with Isabel Allende, The Soul of a Woman (Ballantine: Random House).

Slate interviews Li Juan, Winter Pasture: One Woman's Journey with China's Kazakh Herders (translated by Jack Hargreaves and Yan Yan; Astra: Penguin; LJ starred review).

Entertainment Weekly's "What's in a Page" column features Ransom Riggs, The Desolations of Devil's Acre (Dutton Books for Young Readers).

Jeff VanderMeer, Hummingbird Salamander (MCD: Macmillan), has a conversation with Meg Gardiner at CrimeReads

Shondaland has a Q&A with Avni Doshi, Burnt Sugar (Overlook: Abrams). Also, an interview with Morgan Rogers, Honey Girl (Park Row: HarperCollins). 

Time interviews Tanya Selvaratnam, Assume Nothing: A Story of Intimate Violence (Harper; LJ starred review).

The NYT goes "Inside the List" with Carole Lindstrom and Michaela Goade, We Are Water Protectors (Roaring Brook: Macmillan; SLJ starred review). The paper's "By the Book" column features Ibram X. Kendi, Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019 (One World: Random House; LJ starred review).

"Knowing your needs is the first step toward figuring out where you belong, and I hope readers realize their own needs while reading the book," Phil Stamper says about As Far as You’ll Take Me (Bloomsbury YA) in an interview at Lambda Literary.

Julia Fine talks with The Rumpus about The Upstairs House (Harper).

The Los Angeles Review of Books interviews Suleika JaouadBetween Two Kingdoms: A Memoir of a Life Interrupted (Random House; LJ starred review).

The NYT looks at the shock in Israel over a memoir by Galia Oz, in which she accuses her father Amos Oz, who "was one of Israel’s most celebrated authors," of physical and emotional abuse.

"Kill it. Bury it. Dance on its grave," says Viet Thanh Nguyen of the ubiquitous book blurb in a Wall Street Journal article that questions its necessity. 

A merger of Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster could have a big impact on every aspect of the publishing industry, though, as the NYT notes, fears of Amazon are still the primary concern.

Authors on Air

Uri Singer has picked up the rights to The Silence by Don DeLillo, while he is currently also producing the film adaptation of DeLillo’s White Noise. David Fincher will adapt the graphic novel series The Killer by Alexis Nolent as a feature film. Ryan Gosling will star in The Actor, which is based on Memory by Donald E. Westlake. Dave Erickson, co-creator of Fear The Walking Dead, is developing The Jaunt, based on a Stephen King short story. Musician Dave Grohl will work with his mother, Virginia Hanlon Grohl, to adapt her book From Cradle to Stage: Stories from the Mothers Who Rocked and Raised Rock Stars as a non-scripted six-part series. Actress America Ferrera will direct her first film with an adaptation of I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika SánchezDeadline reports on all.

Nanjala Nyabola discusses Travelling While Black: Essays Inspired by a Life on the Move (Hurst) on NPR's Rough Translation podcast.

NPR's Morning Edition talks with Michaeleen Doucleff about Hunt, Gather, Parent: What Ancient Cultures Can Teach Us About the Lost Art of Raising Happy, Helpful Little Humans (Avid Reader: S. & S.)

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