Tom Batten

241 Articles

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PREMIUM

Drawing Power: Women’s Stories of Sexual Violence, Harassment, and Survival

A stunning collection that viscerally highlights the pervasiveness of sexual violence and the multitude of ways survivors process trauma.
PREMIUM

DCeased

A successfully scary and thrilling vision of the apocalypse, and a surprisingly moving examination of how beacons of hope cope with the realization that the end is nigh. Collects the entire best-selling miniseries.
PREMIUM

La Voz De M.A.Y.O.: Tata Rambo. Vol. 1

Barajas’s passion for his subject is clear, but haphazard pacing and a lack of context regarding the legal and tribal issues involved in the dispute make for an occasionally confusing read. Nevertheless, this is still an essential volume in what Frederick Luis Aldama’s introduction calls “reclaiming, restoring, and affirming Lantinxs as significant shapers of the historical record.”
PREMIUM

Witchfinder: Omnibus. Vol. 1

Riveting mysteries and thrilling action combine in stories with ongoing ramifications for the larger Hellboy universe. A solid purchase.
PREMIUM

Naomi: Season One

An exciting mystery and coming-of-age superhero origin story introducing an original heroine and a cliff-hanger ending sure to have readers eager for future installments. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women’s Fight for Their Rights

An incredibly comprehensive resource for readers seeking a look at women’s history that diverges from what is typically taught in school.

Lupus

Peeters is a compositional genius, utilizing stunning swaths of negative space and thick fields of inky darkness that imbue nearly every panel on every page of this volume with dynamism and pathos.

Holy Hannah

Dinksi (Trying Not To Notice) borrows heavily from the life of charismatic cult leader Jim Jones and the tragic events at Jonestown to create commentary on social media and the dangers of group think, illustrated in a deceptively simple cartooning style that makes the inevitable tragic ending truly jarring.
PREMIUM

The Man Without Talent

While the opening chapters deliver a portrait of an artist’s ennui, later scenes depicting Sukesawa’s interactions with the owner of a bird store and a bookseller in his village reveal that Tsgue’s (Nejishiki) actual interest lies in a withering dissection of male entitlement in a rapidly changing society.

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