Lawrence Olszewski

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PREMIUM

Resistencia: Poems of Protest and Revolution

With their overriding theme of the search for justice and equality in an age of global unrest, these poems may never be more timely.

Ordesa

This stunning work of autobiographical fiction will appeal more to mature readers, who will appreciate its autumnal tone and the catharsis of a man seeking to extract meaning from his past, uncertain whether he has found it or even if he can. [See Prepub Alert, 6/3/20.]
PREMIUM

The Divine Boys

Although Restrepo (Delirium) gives this award-winning novel an effective structure and flowing text, the despicable characters and violent crime are major turnoffs. Heinous though the murder is, the author elicits little pity for the victim and offers no apology or explanation on the perpetrator’s behalf. Appealing to those readers for whom sensationalism and contemptible characters are standard entertainment.

Fracture

The fragmented and destructive power wielded by memory and trauma in developing one’s outlook on life, coupled with a two-pronged narrative technique for character development, makes Neuman’s latest a winner.
PREMIUM

Hurricane Season

Melchor’s English-language debut made the cut for the Booker International 2020 long list and employs a creative storytelling technique, but readers must be forewarned that its vulgar, raunchy language is not for the linguistically squeamish.
PREMIUM

Garden by the Sea

Rodoreda is possibly the most important modern Catalan novelist, and this availability to English speakers corroborates that well-deserved reputation. Though the book was first published in 1967, its aesthetic and literary qualities still hold up well.

Best World Literature 2019

PREMIUM

A Dream Come True: The Collected Stories of Juan Carlos Onetti

The haunting yet engaging stories in this comprehensive collection will expose Onetti to a much broader readership than has heretofore existed.
PREMIUM

The Mutations

In his first work, young Mexican writer Comensal creates markedly credible characters and instills a vein of humor with a cussing parrot and Ramón’s clueless and self-absorbed adolescent children. But this book remains a chilling reminder of the suffering, both physiological and psychological, that cancer patients and their families endure. For those who have cared for a cancer patient or have been victims themselves, it hits very close to home, reminding many that its gravity trumps humor.
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