Doris Lynch

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Owed

In a time when many confront and protest the racism prevalent in our society, Bennett’s new book is vital. Recommended for all collections.
PREMIUM

Whale Day: And Other Poems

Not Collins’s best collection but a solid one that all libraries will want for its emotional resonance during difficult times.
PREMIUM

Asylum: A personal, historical, natural inquiry in 103 lyric sections

Precise language, deft metaphors, and emotional undertones keep audiences invested and sometimes enthralled. Recommended for most collections.

PREMIUM

Obit

Often incorporating short declarative sentences, Chang’s poems can veer toward being list-like but move forward quickly to endings that surprise and even amaze as they burrow deep into those grieving places all of us have experienced. Recommended for most collections.
PREMIUM

Come the Slumberless to the Land of Nod

One of the poet’s great strengths is her ability to forge striking metaphors even if several veer far from the sensate world: “white petals disappear into his shadow like a conclusion.” But that’s a quibble, as most poems impart a passionate fierceness while revealing a shared humanity. Highly recommended for most collections.

PREMIUM

In the Lateness of the World

Throughout her career, Forché has forged poems of witness, and she does so here with beauty and lyricism. The one misstep is an overabundance of list poems; Forché can bring to life objects better than nearly anyone, but we want the revelatory journey behind them. Yet, finally, this bounty of rich poetry is recommended for all collections.
PREMIUM

Living Weapon: Poems

An uneven but interesting collection showcasing life in New York City today, sometimes veering toward dull, ordinary language and sometimes singing with their take on society. For larger collections.

The Anti-Grief

Throughout, Boruch easily folds storytelling into her poems and makes deep emotional connections, as when Dorothy Wordsworth’s life segues into that of the poet’s grandmother. Repetition is occasionally overused, and the poet loses focus in the long poem “Keats Is Coughing,” which compares visits to Rome and Alaska, but overall this is a collection not to be missed.
PREMIUM

Love and I

In nearly every poem, the poet delves deeply. Her questing invites us to read and reread. For all academic and larger public library collections.

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